Expansion of Hong Kong International Airport into a Three-Runway System

Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.9
(For September 2016)

October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

Executive summary

1     Introduction

1.1    Background

1.2    Scope of this Report

1.3    Project Organisation

1.4    Summary of Construction Works

1.5    Summary of EM&A Programme Requirements

2     Air Quality Monitoring

2.1    Monitoring Stations

2.2    Monitoring Requirements and Schedule

2.3    Monitoring Equipment

2.4    Monitoring Methodology

2.4.1     Measuring Procedure

2.4.2     Maintenance and Calibration

2.5    Analysis and Interpretation of Monitoring Results

3     Noise Monitoring

3.1    Monitoring Stations

3.2    Monitoring Requirements and Schedule

3.3    Monitoring Equipment

3.4    Monitoring Methodology

3.4.1     Monitoring Procedure

3.4.2     Maintenance and Calibration

3.5    Analysis and Interpretation of Monitoring Results

4     Water Quality Monitoring

4.1    Monitoring Stations

4.2    Monitoring Requirements and Schedule

4.2.1     Action and Limit Levels for Water Quality Monitoring

4.3    Monitoring Equipment

4.4    Monitoring Methodology

4.4.1     Measuring Procedure

4.4.2     Maintenance and Calibration

4.4.3     Laboratory Measurement / Analysis

4.5    Analysis and Interpretation of Monitoring Results

5     Waste Management

5.1    Monitoring Requirements

5.2    Waste Management Status

6     Chinese White Dolphin Monitoring

6.1    CWD Monitoring Requirements

6.2    CWD Monitoring Transects and Stations

6.2.1     Small Vessel Line-transect Survey

6.2.2     Land-based Theodolite Tracking

6.3    CWD Monitoring Methodology

6.3.1     Small Vessel Line-transect Survey

6.3.2     Photo Identification

6.3.3     Land-based Theodolite Tracking

6.4    Monitoring Results and Observations

6.4.1     Small Vessel Line-transect Survey

6.4.2     Photo Identification

6.4.3     Land-based Theodolite Tracking

6.5    Progress Update on Passive Acoustic Monitoring

6.6    Site Audit for CWD-related Mitigation Measures

6.7    Timing of Reporting CWD Monitoring Results

6.8    Summary of CWD Monitoring

7     Environmental Site Inspection and Audit

7.1    Environmental Site Inspection

7.2    Audit of Route Diversion and Speed Control of the SkyPier High Speed Ferries

7.3    Audit of Construction and Associated Vessels

7.4    Ecological Monitoring

7.5    Status of Submissions under Environmental Permits

7.6    Compliance with Other Statutory Environmental Requirements

7.7    Analysis and Interpretation of Complaints, Notification of Summons and Status of Prosecutions

7.7.1     Complaints

7.7.2     Notifications of Summons or Status of Prosecution

7.7.3     Cumulative Statistics

8     Future Key Issues and Other EIA & EM&A Issues

8.1    Construction Programme for the Coming Reporting Period

8.2    Key Environmental Issues for the Coming Reporting Period

8.3    Monitoring Schedule for the Coming Reporting Period

9     Conclusion and Recommendation

 

 

Tables

Table 1.1: Contact Information of Key Personnel 4

Table 1.2: Summary of status for all environmental aspects under the Updated EM&A Manual 6

Table 2.1:  Locations of Impact Air Quality Monitoring Stations  8

Table 2.2:  Action and Limit Levels for 1-hour TSP  8

Table 2.3:  Air Quality Monitoring Equipment 8

Table 2.4: Summary of 1-hour TSP Monitoring Results  9

Table 3.1: Locations of Impact Noise Monitoring Stations  10

Table 3.2: Action and Limit Levels for Construction Noise  10

Table 3.3: Noise Monitoring Equipment 11

Table 3.4: Summary of Construction Noise Monitoring Results  12

Table 4.1: Monitoring Locations and Parameters for Impact Water Quality Monitoring  13

Table 4.2: Action and Limit Levels for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring  14

Table 4.3: The Control and Impact stations during flood tide and ebb tide for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring  15

Table 4.4: Water Quality Monitoring Equipment 15

Table 4.5: Laboratory measurement/ analysis of SS and heavy metals  16

Table 5.1: Action and Limit Levels for Construction Waste  17

Table 6.1: Derived Values of Action Level (AL) and Limit Level (LL) for Chinese White Dolphin Monitoring  18

Table 6.2: Coordinates of Transect Lines in NEL, NWL, AW, WL and SWL Survey Areas  19

Table 6.3: Land-based Survey Station Details  20

Table 6.4: STG and ANI of Chinese White Dolphin of the Whole Survey Area in September 2016 and Running Quarterly STG and ANI 24

Table 6.5: Summary of Photo Identification  25

Table 6.6: Summary of Survey Effort and CWD Group of Land-based Theodolite Tracking  26

Table 7.1: Summary of Key Audit Findings against the SkyPier Plan  29

Table 7.2: Status of Submissions under Environmental Permit 30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figures

Figure 1.1- 1.2

Locations of Key Construction Activities in this reporting period

Figure 2.1

Locations of Air and Noise Monitoring Stations and Chek Lap Kok Wind Station

Figure 3.1

Figure 6.1

Figure 6.2

Figure 6.3

Figure 6.4


Figure 6.5

Locations of Water Quality Monitoring Stations 

Vessel based Dolphin Monitoring Transects in Baseline Monitoring

Land based Dolphin Monitoring in Baseline and Construction Phases

Sightings Distribution of Chinese White Dolphins

Plots of First Sightings of All CWD Groups obtained from Land-based Stations

Location for Autonomous Passive Acoustic Monitoring in Baseline and Construction Phases

Figure 7.1

Duration of the SkyPier HSFs travelled through the SCZ for 1 – 30 September 2016

 

 

Appendices

 

 

Appendix A

Environmental Mitigation Implementation Schedule (EMIS) for Construction Phase

Appendix B

Calibration Certificates

Appendix C

Monitoring Schedule

Appendix D

Monitoring Results

Appendix E

Status of Environmental Permits and Licences

Appendix F

Cumulative Statistics on Exceedances, Environmental Complaints, Notification of Summons and Status of Prosecutions

Appendix G

Data of SkyPier HSF Movements to/from Zhuhai and Macau (between 1 and 30 September 2016)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Executive summary

The “Expansion of Hong Kong International Airport into a Three-Runway System” (the Project) serves to meet the future air traffic demands at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA).  On 7 November 2014, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report (Register No.: AEIAR-185/2014) for the Project was approved and an Environmental Permit (EP) (Permit No.: EP-489/2014) was issued for the construction and operation of the Project.

Airport Authority Hong Kong (AAHK) commissioned Mott MacDonald Hong Kong Limited (MMHK) to undertake the role of Environmental Team (ET) for carrying out the Environmental Monitoring & Audit (EM&A) works during the construction phase of the Project in accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual.

The commencement of initial reclamation works was announced on 1 August 2016.  This is the 9th Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report for the Project which summarizes the monitoring results and audit findings of the EM&A programme during the reporting period from 1 September 2016 to 30 September 2016. 

Key Activities in the Reporting Period

The key activities of the Project carried out in the reporting month were related to Contract P560(R) Aviation Fuel Pipeline Diversion Works (Contract P560(R)) which involved pilot hole drilling using Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) method at launching site, stockpiling of excavated materials from HDD operation at stockpiling area, site preparation works and construction of containment pit at Sheung Sha Chau. CLP cable diversion enabling work contract involved site preparation works at the western part of the airport. The four DCM contracts involved site survey and investigation works. No marine construction works was carried out during the reporting period.

EM&A Activities Conducted in the Reporting Period

The monthly EM&A programme was undertaken in accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual of the Project. During the reporting period, the ET conducted thirty-three sets of air quality measurements, twenty sets of construction noise measurements, thirteen events of water quality measurements, one ecological monitoring on Sheung Sha Chau Island, two complete sets of small vessel line-transect surveys and five days of land-based theodolite tracking survey effort for Chinese White Dolphin (CWD) monitoring as well as environmental site inspections, landscape & visual and waste monitoring.

On the implementation of the SkyPier Plan, the daily movements of all SkyPier High Speed Ferries (HSFs) in September 2016 were 87 to 95 daily movements, which are within the maximum daily cap of 125 daily movements.  A total of 814 HSF movements under SkyPier Plan were recorded. All HSFs had travelled through the SCZ with prevailing speed under 15 knots (7.8 to 14.4 knots) in compliance with the SkyPier Plan. One ferry movement had minor deviation from the diverted route which is related to safety / emergency situation. In summary, the ET and IEC have audited the HSF movements against the SkyPier Plan and conducted follow up investigation or actions accordingly.

On the implementation of the Marine Travel Routes and Management Plan for Construction and Associated Vessel (MTRMP-CAV), ET has conducted weekly audit of relevant information, including AIS data, vessel tracks and other relevant records to ensure the Contractors are fully compliance with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV.  Trainings have been held with the Contractor senior management staff and concerned skippers to facilitating them in familiarise with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV and strengthen the communication between senior management staff and the sub-contractors. 

Results of Impact Monitoring

All 1-hour total suspended particulate (TSP) monitoring was conducted as scheduled in the reporting period. Three exceedance cases of action level were recorded on 27 September 2016.  The investigation results indicated that the exceedances were likely related to the background air quality level but not project-related.

All construction noise and waste monitoring were conducted as scheduled in the reporting period.  No exceedance of the Action/ Limit Levels was recorded. Monthly ecological monitoring on Sheung Sha Chau Island observed that site preparation work was conducted at Sheung Sha Chau and there was no encroachment or disturbance to the egretry area at Sheung Sha Chau by the works. 

Water quality monitoring and CWD monitoirng were conducted as scheduled although no marine construction works was carried out during the reporting period.

Summary of Upcoming Key Issues

Key activities anticipated in the next reporting period for the Project will be under the following contracts including:

Advanced works Contract:

Contract P560 (R) Aviation Fuel Pipeline Diversion Works

    HDD pilot hole drilling;

    Stockpiling of excavated materials from HDD operation;

    Construction of containment pit at Sheung Sha Chau.

 

DCM Contracts:

Contract 3201 to 3204 Deep Cement Mixing Works

    Laying of geotextile and sand blanket

 

Other Contracts:

Contract 3213 CLP Cable Diversion Enabling Works

    Installation of silt curtain; and

    Removal of existing armour rocks.

Other site investigation works will continue. The key environmental issues will be associated with dust, noise generation, water quality, construction waste management, CWD and ecology on Sheung Sha Chau. The implementation of required mitigation measures by the Contractor will be monitored by the ET.

 

 

 

 

Vessel-based CWD Monitoring

Overview of the site of CLP cable diversion enabling works

Construction Vessel Skipper Training

 

Summary Table

The following table summarizes the key findings of the EM&A programme during the reporting period from 1 to 30 September 2016:

 

Yes

No

Details

Analysis / Recommendation / Remedial Actions

Breaches of Limit Level^

 

ü

No exceedance of project-related limit level was recorded.

Nil

Breaches of Action Level^

 

ü

No exceedance of project-related action level was recorded.

Nil

Complaints Received

 

ü

No construction activities related complaints were received.

Nil

Notification of any summons and status of prosecutions

 

ü

Neither notifications of summons nor prosecution were received. 

Nil

Changes that affect the EM&A

 

ü

There were no changes to the construction works that may affect the EM&A

Nil

Remarks:   ^ only exceedance of action/ limit level related to Project works will be highlighted. 

 

1        Introduction

1.1      Background

On 7 November 2014, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report (Register No.: AEIAR-185/2014) for the “Expansion of Hong Kong International Airport into a Three-Runway System” (the Project) was approved and an Environmental Permit (EP) (Permit No.: EP-489/2014) was issued for the construction and operation of the Project.

Airport Authority Hong Kong (AAHK) commissioned Mott MacDonald Hong Kong Limited (MMHK) to undertake the role of Environmental Team (ET) for carrying out the Environmental Monitoring & Audit (EM&A) works during the construction phase of the Project in accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual (the Manual) submitted under EP Condition 3.1.  The Manual is available on the Project’s dedicated website (accessible at: http://env.threerunwaysystem.com/en/index.html). AECOM Asia Company Limited (AECOM) was employed by AAHK as the Independent Environmental Checker (IEC) for the Project.

The Project covers the expansion of the existing airport into a three-runway system (3RS) with key project components comprising land formation of about 650 ha and all associated facilities and infrastructure including taxiways, aprons, aircraft stands, a passenger concourse, an expanded Terminal 2, all related airside and landside works and associated ancillary and supporting facilities.  The existing submarine aviation fuel pipelines and submarine power cables also require diversion as part of the works.  

Construction of the Project is to proceed in the general order of diversion of the submarine aviation fuel pipelines, diversion of the submarine power cables, land formation, and construction of infrastructure, followed by construction of superstructures.

The commencement of initial reclamation works was announced on 1 August 2016.  The updated overall phasing programme of all construction works was presented in Appendix A of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No. 7 and the contract information was presented in Appendix A of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.8.

1.2      Scope of this Report

This is the 9th Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report for the Project which summarizes the key findings of the EM&A programme during the reporting period from 1 to 30 September 2016.

1.3      Project Organisation

The Project’s organization structure remained unchanged during the reporting month. The Project’s organization structure can be referred to Appendix B of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.1. Contact details of the key personnel have been updated and is presented in Table 1.1

Table 1.1: Contact Information of Key Personnel

Party

Position

Name

Telephone

Project Manager’s Representative

(Airport Authority Hong Kong)

Senior Manager, Environment

Lawrence Tsui

2183 2734

Environmental Team (ET)

(Mott MacDonald Hong Kong Limited)

Environmental Team Leader

Terence Kong

2828 5919

 

Deputy Environmental Team Leader

Heidi Yu

2828 5704

 

Deputy Environmental Team Leader

Keith Chau

2972 1721

Independent Environmental Checker (IEC)

(AECOM Asia Company Limited)

Independent Environmental Checker

Jackel Law

3922 9376

 

 

Deputy Independent Environmental Checker

Joanne Tsoi

3922 9423

Advanced Works Contract:

 

 

 

Contract P560(R) Aviation Fuel Pipeline Diversion Works

(Langfang Huayuan Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Co., Ltd.)

Project Manager

 

Shih Wei

 

2117 0566

 

Environmental Officer

Lyn Lau

 

5172 6543

 

DCM Works Contracts:

 

 

 

Contract 3201 DCM  (Package 1)

(Penta-Ocean-China State-Dong-Ah Joint Venture)

Project Director

 

Mr. Tsugunari SUZUKI

 

9178 9689

 

Environmental Officer

 

Mr. Kanny CHO

 

9019 1962

Contract 3202 DCM  (Package 2)

(Samsung-BuildKing Joint Venture)

Project Manager

 

Mr. Ilkwon Nam

 

9643 3117

 

Environmental Officer

 

Mr. Dickson Mak

 

9525 8408

Contract 3203 DCM  (Package 3)

(Sambo E&C Co.,Ltd)

Deputy Project Manager

 

Mr. Park Seong Jae

 

9683 8693

 

Environmental Officer

 

Mr. Leung Min Pong

 

9203 5820

Contract 3204 DCM  (Package 4)

(CRBC-SAMBO Joint Venture)

Project Manager

 

Mr. Yoo Kyung-Sik 

 

9683 8697

 

 

Environmental Officer

 

Mr. David Man

6421 3238

Other Works contract:

 

 

 

Contract 3213 CLP Cable Diversion Enabling Works (Wing Hing Construction Company)

 

Environmental Officer

 

Mr. Kan Yun Tai, Michael

9206 0550

 

Environmental Officer

Ms Ivy Tam

2151 2090

 

1.4      Summary of Construction Works

During the reporting period, no marine construction work was carried out.  Key activities of the Project were related to the Contract P560(R) Aviation Fuel Pipeline Diversion Works (Contract P560(R)) which involved pilot hole drilling at the HDD launching site located at the west part of the airport, site preparation works and construction of containment pit at Sheung Sha Chau. CLP cable diversion enabling work contract involved site preparation works. The four DCM contracts involved site survey and investigation works.

The active construction site is around 3 km and 900m away from the nearest air and noise sensitive receivers in Tung Chung and the villages in North Lantau. The locations of the works areas are presented in Figure 1.1 to Figure 1.2. Some site investigation works were carried out during the reporting period.

1.5      Summary of EM&A Programme Requirements

As presented in the Updated EM&A Manual, the environmental aspects of interest for the Project include air quality, noise, water quality, waste management, land contamination, terrestrial ecology, marine ecology, fisheries, landscape & visual, sewage and sewerage, and hazard to human life. 

The status for all environmental aspects is presented Table 1.2. The EM&A requirements remained unchanged during the reporting period and details can be referred to Table 1.2 of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No. 1.

Table 1.2: Summary of status for all environmental aspects under the Updated EM&A Manual

Parameters

Status

Air Quality

 

Baseline Monitoring

The baseline air quality monitoring result has been reported in Baseline Monitoring Report (Version 1) and submitted to EPD under EP Condition 3.4.

Impact Monitoring

On-going

Noise

 

Baseline Monitoring

The baseline noise monitoring result has been reported in Baseline Monitoring Report (Version 1) and submitted to EPD under EP Condition 3.4.

Impact Monitoring

On-going

Water Quality

 

General Baseline Water Quality Monitoring for reclamation, water jetting and field joint works

The baseline water quality monitoring result has been reported in Water Quality Baseline Monitoring Report and submitted to EPD under EP Condition 3.4.

General Impact Water Quality Monitoring for reclamation, water jetting and field joint works

The general water quality monitoring is on-going, although there were no marine construction works.

Initial Intensive Deep Cement Mixing (DCM) Water Quality Monitoring

To be commenced according to the detailed plan on DCM

Early/ Regular DCM Water Quality Monitoring

The early regular DCM water quality monitoring is on-going, although there were no marine construction works.

Waste Management

 

Waste Monitoring

On-going

Land Contamination

 

Supplementary Contamination Assessment Plan (CAP)

To be submitted with the relevant construction works

Contamination Assessment Report (CAR) for Golf Course

The CAR for Golf Course was submitted to EPD.

Terrestrial Ecology

 

Pre-construction Egretry Survey Egretry Survey Plan

The revised Egretry Survey Plan was submitted and approved by EPD under EP Condition 2.14.

Ecological Monitoring

On-going

Marine Ecology

 

Pre-Contruction Phase Coral Dive Survey

The Coral Translocation Plan was submitted and approved by EPD under EP Condition 2.12.

Coral Translocation

On-going

Chinese White Dolphins (CWD)

Vessel survey, land-based theodolite track and passive acoustic monitoring (PAM)

Baseline Monitoring

Baseline CWD results were reported in the CWD Baseline Monitoring Report and submitted to EPD in accordance with EP Condition 3.4.

Impact Monitoring

Monitoring of CWDs is on-going, although there were no marine construction works.

Landscape & Visual

 

Baseline Monitoring

The baseline landscape & visual monitoring result has been reported in Baseline Monitoring Report (Version 1) and submitted to EPD under EP Condition 3.4.

Impact Monitoring

On-going

Environmental Auditing

 

Regular site inspection

On-going

SkyPier High Speed Ferries (HSF) implementation measures

On-going

Construction and Associated Vessels Implementation measures

On-going

Complaint Hotline and Email channel

On-going

Environmental Log Book

On-going

Taking into account the construction works in this reporting month, impact monitoring of air quality, noise, waste management, ecology and landscape & visual were carried out in the reporting month. Water quality monitoring and CWD monitoring were conducted as scheduled although there were no marine construction works during the reporting period. The EM&A programme also involved weekly site inspections and related auditings conducted by the ET for checking the implementation of the required environmental mitigation measures recommended in the approved EIA Report. 

The EM&A programme has been following the recommendations presented in the approved EIA Report and the Updated EM&A Manual. A summary of implementation status of the environmental mitigation measures for the construction phase of the Project during the reporting period is provided in Appendix A.

 

2        Air Quality Monitoring

2.1      Monitoring Stations

Air quality monitoring was conducted at two representative monitoring stations in the vicinity of air sensitive receivers in Tung Chung and villages in North Lantau in accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual. Table 2.1 describes the details of the monitoring stations. Figure 2.1 shows the locations of the monitoring stations.

Table 2.1:  Locations of Impact Air Quality Monitoring Stations

Monitoring Station

Location

AR1A

Man Tung Road Park

AR2

Village House at Tin Sum

2.2      Monitoring Requirements and Schedule

In accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual, baseline 1-hour total suspended particulate (TSP) levels at the two air quality monitoring stations were established as presented in the Baseline Monitoring Report (Version 1 dated December 2015). Impact 1-hour TSP monitoring was conducted for three times every 6 days. The Action and Limit Levels of the air quality monitoring are provided in Table 2.2.  The air quality monitoring schedule involved in the reporting period is provided in Appendix C.

Table 2.2:  Action and Limit Levels for 1-hour TSP

Monitoring Station

Action Level (mg/m3)

Limit Level (mg/m3)

AR1A

306

500

AR2

298

2.3      Monitoring Equipment

Portable direct reading dust meter was used to carry out the 1-hour TSP monitoring. Details of equipment are given in Table 2.3.

Table 2.3:  Air Quality Monitoring Equipment

Equipment

Brand and Model                  

Last Calibration Date                  

Portable direct reading dust meter (Laser dust monitor)

SIBTA LD-3B-002

(Serial No. 974350)

5 Oct 2015

2.4      Monitoring Methodology

2.4.1      Measuring Procedure

The measurement procedures involved in the impact 1-hr TSP monitoring can be summarised as follows: 

a.   The portable direct reading dust meter was mounted on a tripod at a height of 1.2 m above the ground.

b.   Prior to the measurement, the equipment was set up for 1 minute span check and 6 second background check.

c.   The one hour dust measurement was started. Site conditions and dust sources at the nearby area were recorded on a record sheet.

d.   When the measurement completed, the “Count” reading per hour was recorded for result calculation.

2.4.2      Maintenance and Calibration

The portable direct reading dust meter is calibrated every year against high volume sampler (HVS) to check the validity and accuracy of the results measured by direct reading method. The calibration certificates of the portable direct reading dust meter and calibration record of the HVS provided in Appendix B of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.8 are still valid. Any updates of calibration certificates will be reported in the Monthly EM&A report if necessary.

2.5      Analysis and Interpretation of Monitoring Results

The monitoring results for 1-hour TSP are summarized in Table 2.4. Detailed impact monitoring results are presented in Appendix D.

Table 2.4: Summary of 1-hour TSP Monitoring Results

Monitoring Station

1-hr TSP Concentration Range (mg/m3)

Action Level (mg/m3)

Limit Level (mg/m3)

AR1A

29 - 404

306

500

AR2

25 - 179

298

Three exceedance cases of action level of air quality monitoring were recorded at AR1A on 27 September 2016 in the 1-hour TSP monitoring that started at 08:52am, 09:52am and 10:52am. Actions were taken accordingly based on the established Event and Action Plan as presented in the Updated EM&A Manual. IEC and AAHK were informed of the exceedances.

According to on-site observation by monitoring team, haze weather was observed during monitoring. No major construction dust emission source was observed during monitoring. Based on the information from Hong Kong Observatory, tropical cyclone Megi was approaching Taiwan, its subsidence airstream create unfavourable conditions for the dispersion of pollutants and lead to low visibility to Hong Kong. According to EPD’s pollutant concentration summary at Tung Chung from 08:00 to 12:00 on 27 September 2016, relatively high PM10  ranging from 104 -159 µg/m3 was recorded.

Relevant contractors were informed of the exceedances. As informed by the contractors, no major dusty activities were conducted during monitoring. The major land works were related to P560(R) HDD pilot hole drill, stockpiling of excavated materials and site preparation works at Sha Chau.

The exceedances of 1-hr TSP may possibly due to the air quality impact induced by tropical cyclone Megi. Considered that no major project-related dusty construction work was conducted during monitoring, the exceedance was considered not due to 3RS project construction works and therefore, no repeat measurement is requirement.  

 

 

3        Noise Monitoring

3.1      Monitoring Stations

Noise monitoring was conducted at five representative monitoring stations in the vicinity of noise sensitive receivers in Tung Chung and villages in North Lantau in accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual. Figure 2.1 shows the locations of the monitoring stations and these are described in Table 3.1 below. As described in Section 4.3.3 of the Updated EM&A Manual, monitoring at NM2 will commence when the future residential buildings in Tung Chung West Development become occupied.

Table 3.1: Locations of Impact Noise Monitoring Stations

Monitoring Station

Location

Type of measurement

NM1A

Man Tung Road Park

Free field

NM2(1)

Tung Chung West Development

To be determined

NM3A

Site Office

Facade  

NM4

Ching Chung Hau Po Woon Primary School

Free field

NM5

Village House in Tin Sum

Free field

NM6

House No. 1, Sha Lo Wan

Free field

Note: (1) As described in Section 4.3.3 of the Updated EM&A Manual, noise monitoring at NM2 will only commence after occupation of the future Tung Chung West Development.

3.2      Monitoring Requirements and Schedule

In accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual, baseline noise levels at the noise monitoring stations were established as presented in the Baseline Monitoring Report (Version 1 dated December 2015). Impact noise monitoring was conducted once per week in the form of 30-minute measurements of Leq, L10 and L90 levels recorded at each monitoring station between 0700 and 1900 on normal weekdays. The Action and Limit levels of the noise monitoring are provided in Table 3.2. The construction noise monitoring schedule involved in the reporting period is provided in Appendix C.

Table 3.2: Action and Limit Levels for Construction Noise

Monitoring Stations

Time Period

Action Level

Limit Level, Leq(30mins) dB(A)

NM1A, NM2, NM3A, NM4, NM5 and NM6

0700-1900 hours on normal weekdays

When one documented

complaint is received from

any one of the sensitive

receivers

75 dB(A)(i)

Note: (i) reduce to 70dB(A) for school and 65dB(A) during school examination periods.

3.3      Monitoring Equipment

Noise monitoring was performed using sound level meter at each designated monitoring station.  The sound level meters deployed comply with the International Electrotechnical Commission Publications 651:1979 (Type 1) and 804:1985 (Type 1) specifications.  Acoustic calibrator was used to check the sound level meters by a known sound pressure level for field measurement.  Details of equipment are given in Table 3.3.

Table 3.3: Noise Monitoring Equipment

Equipment

Brand and Model

Last Calibration Date

Integrated Sound Level Meter

B&K 2238 (Serial No. 2800932)

19 Jul 2016

B&K 2238 (Serial No. 2381580)

8 Sep 2016

B&K 2238 (Serial No. 2808432)

10 Nov 2015

Acoustic Calibrator

B&K 4231 (Serial No. 3003246)

16 May 2016

B&K 4231 (Serial No. 3004068)

19 Jul 2016

3.4      Monitoring Methodology

3.4.1      Monitoring Procedure

The monitoring procedures involved in the noise impact monitoring can be summarised as follows: 

a.   The sound level meter was set on a tripod at least a height of 1.2 m above the ground for free-field measurements at monitoring stations NM1A, NM4, NM5 and NM6. A correction of +3 dB(A) was applied to the free field measurements.

b.   Façade measurements were made at the monitoring station NM3A.

c.   Parameters such as frequency weighting, time weighting and measurement time were set.

d.   Prior to and after each noise measurement, the meter was calibrated using the acoustic calibrator.  If the difference in the calibration level before and after measurement was more than 1 dB(A), the measurement would be considered invalid and repeat of noise measurement would be required after re-calibration or repair of the equipment.

e.   During the monitoring period, Leq, L10 and L90 were recorded.  In addition, site conditions and noise sources were recorded on a record sheet.

f.    Noise measurement results were corrected with reference to the baseline monitoring levels.

g.   Observations were recorded when high intrusive noise (e.g. dog barking, helicopter noise) was observed during the monitoring.

3.4.2      Maintenance and Calibration

The maintenance and calibration procedures are summarised below:

a.   The microphone head of the sound level meter was cleaned with soft cloth at regular intervals.

b.   The meter and calibrator were sent to the supplier or laboratory accredited under Hong Kong Laboratory Accreditation Scheme (HOKLAS) to check and calibrate at yearly intervals.

Calibration certificates of the sound level meters and acoustic calibrators used in the noise monitoring provided in Appendix B of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.8 are still valid. The sound level meter calibrated in September 2016 is provided in Appendix B.

3.5      Analysis and Interpretation of Monitoring Results

The construction noise monitoring results are summarized in Table 3.4 and the detailed monitoring data are provided in Appendix D.

Table 3.4: Summary of Construction Noise Monitoring Results

Monitoring Station

Noise Level Range, dB(A)

Leq (30 mins)

Limit Level, dB(A)

Leq (30 mins)

NM1A(i)

71 - 73

75

NM3A

61 - 62

75

NM4(i)

64 - 66

70(ii)

NM5(i)

53 - 58

75

NM6(i)

65 - 73

75

Note:      (i) +3 dB(A) Façade correction included;

               (ii) Reduced to 65 dB(A) during school examination periods. 

As the construction activities were far away from the monitoring stations, major sources of noise dominating the monitoring stations observed during the construction noise impact monitoring were aircraft noise at NM3A and NM5, aircraft noise and helicopter noise at NM6, road traffic noise at NM1A and school activities at NM4 in this reporting month. 

No exceedance of the Action/ Limit Level was recorded at all monitoring stations in the reporting period.

 

 

 

 

4        Water Quality Monitoring

4.1      Monitoring Stations

Water quality monitoring was conducted at a total of 22 water quality monitoring stations, comprising 12 impact stations, seven sensitive receiver stations and three control stations in the vicinity of water quality sensitive receivers around the airport island in accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual. Table 4.1 describes the details of the monitoring stations. Figure 3.1 shows the locations of the monitoring stations. 

Table 4.1: Monitoring Locations and Parameters for Impact Water Quality Monitoring

 

Monitoring Stations

 

Coordinates

 

Description

Easting

Northing

Parameters

C1

Control

804247

815620

 

C2

Control

806945

825682

 

C3(3)

Control

817803

822109

 

IM1

Impact

806458

818351

DO, pH, Temperature, Salinity, Turbidity, SS, Total Alkalinity, Heavy Metals(2)

IM2

Impact

806193

818852

IM3

Impact

806019

819411

IM4

Impact

805039

819570

IM5

Impact

804924

820564

IM6

Impact

805828

821060

IM7

Impact

806835

821349

IM8

Impact

807838

821695

IM9

Impact

808811

822094

 

IM10

Impact

809838

822240

IM11

Impact

810545

821501

IM12

Impact

811519

821162

SR1(1)

Future Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge Hong Kong Boundary Crossing Facilities (HKBCF) Seawater Intake for cooling

812586

820069

DO, pH, Temperature, Salinity, Turbidity, SS

 

SR2(3)

Planned marine park / hard corals at The Brothers / Tai Mo To

814166

821463

SR3

Sha Chau and Lung Kwu Chau Marine Park / fishing and spawning grounds in North Lantau

807571

822147

SR4A

Sha Lo Wan

807810

817189

SR5A

San Tau Beach SSSI

810696

816593

SR6

Tai Ho Bay, Near Tai Ho Stream SSSI

814663

817899

SR7

Ma Wan Fish Culture Zone (FCZ)

823742

823636

SR8

Seawater Intake for cooling at Hong Kong International Airport (East)

811593

820417

Notes:

(1) the seawater intakes of SR1 for the future HKBCF is not yet in operation, the future permanent location for SR1

during impact monitoring is subject to finalisation after the HKBCF seawater is commissioned.

 

(2) According to the Baseline Water Quality Monitoring Report, Chromium and Nickel are the representative heavy metals for early regular DCM monitoring. DCM specific water quality monitoring parameters (total alkalinity and heavy metals) were only conducted at C1 to C3, IM1 to IM12.

(3) according to the baseline water quality monitoring report, C3 station is not adequately representative as a control

station of impact/ SR stations. The control reference has been changed from C3 to SR2 from 1 September 2016 

onwards.

4.2      Monitoring Requirements and Schedule

In accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual, baseline water quality levels at the abovementioned representative water quality monitoring stations were established as presented in the Baseline Water Quality Monitoring Report.

General and early regular DCM water quality monitoring was conducted three days per week, at mid-flood and mid-ebb tides, at the 22 water quality monitoring stations during the reporting period, although there were no marine construction works. The sea condition varied from clam to rough, and the weather varied from fine to rainy during the monitoring period.

The water quality monitoring schedule for the reporting period is provided in Appendix C.

4.2.1      Action and Limit Levels for Water Quality Monitoring

The Action and Limit Levels levels for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring are presented in Table 4.2. The control and impact stations during flood tide and ebb tide for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring are presented in Table 4.3.

Table 4.2: Action and Limit Levels for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring

Parameters

Action Level (AL)

Limit Level (LL)

Action and Limit Levels for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring

(excluding SR1& SR8)

DO in mg/L

(Surface, Middle & Bottom)

Surface and Middle

4.8 mg/L

Surface and Middle

4.1 mg/L

5 mg/L for Fish Culture Zone (SR7) only

Bottom

3.1 mg/L

Bottom

2.3 mg/L

Suspended Solids (SS) in mg/L

25

or 120% of upstream control station at the same tide of the same day, whichever is higher

36

or 130% of upstream control station at the same tide of the same day, whichever is higher

Turbidity in NTU

26.0

41.4

Total Alkalinity in ppm

95

98

Representative Heavy Metals for early regular DCM monitoring

(Chromium)

0.2

0.2

Representative Heavy Metals for early regular DCM monitoring

(Nickel)

3.2

 

3.4

 

Action and Limit Levels SR1

 

 

 

SS (mg/l)

To be determined prior to its commissioning

To be determined prior to its commissioning

Action and Limit Levels SR8

 

 

 

 

SS (mg/l)

52

 

60

 

Note:

1. For DO measurement, non-compliance occurs when monitoring result is lower than the limits.

2. For parameters other than DO, non-compliance of water quality results when monitoring results is higher than the limits.

3. Depth-averaged results are used unless specified otherwise.

4. Details of selection criteria for the two heavy metals for early regular DCM monitoring refer to the Detailed Plan on Deep Cement Mixing available on the dedicated 3RS website http://env.threerunwaysystem.com/en/ep-submissions.html)

5. The action and limit levels for the two representative heavy metals chosen will be the same as that for the intensive DCM monitoring.

Table 4.3: The Control and Impact stations during flood tide and ebb tide for general water quality monitoring and regular DCM monitoring

 

Control Station

Impact Stations

Flood Tide

 

C1

IM1, IM2, IM3, IM4, IM5, IM6, IM7, IM8, SR3

SR2^1

IM7, IM8, IM9, IM10, IM11, IM12, SR1A, SR3, SR4A, SR5A, SR6, SR8

Ebb Tide

 

C1

SR4A, SR5A, SR6

C2

IM1, IM2, IM3, IM4, IM5, IM6, IM7, IM8, IM9, IM10, IM11, IM12, SR1A, SR2, SR3, SR7, SR8

^1 As per findings of Baseline Water Quality Report, the control reference has been changed from C3 to SR2 from 1 Sep 2016 onwards.

4.3      Monitoring Equipment

Table 4.4 summarises the equipment used in the impact water quality monitoring programme.

Table 4.4: Water Quality Monitoring Equipment

Equipment

Brand and Model

 

Water Sampler

Van Dorn Water Sampler

 

Positioning Device (measurement of GPS)

Garmin eTrex Vista HCx

 

Water Depth Detector  (measurement of water depth)

Lowrance Mark 5x

 

Current Meter (measurement of current speed and direction)

Sontek HydroSurveyor

 

Equipment

Brand and Model

Last Calibration Date

Multifunctional Meter (measurement of DO, pH, temperature, salinity and turbidity)

YSI 6920 V2  (serial no. 000109DF)

16 Jul 2016

 

YSI 6920 V2 (serial no. 00019CB2)

16 Jul 2016

Digital Titrator (measurement of total alkalinity)

Titrette Digital Burette 50ml Class A

(serial no.10N64701)

15 Jul 2016

 

Titrette Digital Burette 50ml Class A

(serial no. 10N60623)

15 Jul 2016

4.4      Monitoring Methodology

4.4.1      Measuring Procedure

Water quality monitoring samples were taken at three depths (at 1m below surface, at mid-depth, and at 1m above bottom) for locations with water depth >6m. For locations with water depth between 3m and 6m, water samples were taken at two depths (surface and bottom). For locations with water depth <3m, only the surface depth was taken. Duplicate water samples were taken and analysed.

The water samples for all monitoring parameters were collected, stored, preserved and analysis according to the Standard Methods, APHA 22nd ed. and/or other methods as agreed by the EPD. In-situ measurements at monitoring locations including temperature, pH, DO, turbidity, salinity and water depth were collected by equipment listed in Table 4.4. Water samples for heavy metals and SS analysis were stored in high density polythene bottles with no preservative added, packed in ice (cooled to 4 ºC without being frozen), delivered to the laboratory within 24 hours of collection.

4.4.2      Maintenance and Calibration

Calibration of In-situ instruments

All in-situ monitoring instrument were checked, calibrated and certified by a laboratory accredited under HOKLAS before use. Responses of sensors and electrodes were checked with certified standard solutions before each use.

Wet bulb calibration for a DO meter was carried out before commencement of monitoring and after completion of all measurements each day. Calibration was not conducted at each monitoring location as daily calibration is adequate for the type of DO meter employed. A zero check in distilled water was performed with the turbidity probe at least once per monitoring day. The probe should then be calibrated with a solution of known NTU. In addition, the turbidity probe was calibrated at least twice per month to establish the relationship between turbidity readings (in NTU) and levels of suspended solids (in mg/L).  Accuracy check of the digital titrator was performed at least once per monitoring day.

Calibration certificates of the monitoring equipment used in the monitoring provided in Appendix B of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.8 are still valid. Any updates of calibration certificates will be reported in the Monthly EM&A report if necessary.

4.4.3      Laboratory Measurement / Analysis

Analysis of SS and heavy metals have been carried out by a HOKLAS accredited laboratory, ALS Technichem (HK) Pty Ltd (Reg. No. HOKLAS 066). Sufficient water samples were collected at all the monitoring stations for carrying out the laboratory SS and heavy metals determination. The SS and heavy metals determination works were started within 24 hours after collection of the water samples. The analysis of SS and heavy metals have followed the standard methods summarised in Table 4.5. The QA/QC procedures for laboratory measurement/ analysis of SS and heavy metals was presented in Appendix F of the Construction Phase Monthly EM&A Report No.8.

Table 4.5: Laboratory measurement/ analysis of SS and heavy metals

Parameters

Instrumentation

Analytical Method

Reporting Limit

Suspended Solid (SS)

Analytical Balance

APHA 2540D

2 mg/L

Heavy Metals

 

 

 

Chromium (Cr)

ICP-MS

USEPA 6020A

0.2 µg/L

Nickel (Ni)

ICP-MS

USEPA 6020A

0.2 µg/L

4.5      Analysis and Interpretation of Monitoring Results

No marine construction works was conducted during the reporting period and hence no adverse water quality impact arised from the project was observed.  The general water quality monitoring was completed as scheduled.  Water quality monitoring results and graphical presentations are provided in Appendix D.

 

5        Waste Management

5.1      Monitoring Requirements

In accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual, the waste generated from construction activities was audited once per week to determine if wastes are being managed in accordance with the Waste Management Plan (WMP) prepared for the Project, contract-specific WMP, and any statutory and contractual requirements. All aspects of waste management including waste generation, storage, transportation and disposal were assessed during the audits. The Action and Limit levels of the construction waste are provided in Table 5.1.

Table 5.1: Action and Limit Levels for Construction Waste

Monitoring Stations

Action Level

Limit Level

Construction Area

When one valid documented complaint is

received

Non-compliance of the WMP, contract-specific

WMPs, any statutory and contractual

requirements

5.2      Waste Management Status

Weekly monitoring on all works contracts were carried out by the ET to check and monitor the implementation of proper waste management practices during the construction phase.

Recommendation was provided for P560(R) Aviation Fuel Pipeline Diversion Works during monitoring including review of the capacity of chemical waste storage area on 26 September 2016. The contractor had followed up with implementation of mitigation measures.

Based on the updated information, about 127m3 excavated materials were produced from the HDD launching site under P560(R) in September 2016. The generated excavated materials were temporarily stored at storage and stockpiling area. The excavated material will be reused in the Project.

In addition, metals and paper were recycled during the reporting month. 4.2 tonnes of general refuse were disposed of to the West New Territories (WENT) Landfill in September 2016. No Construction and Demolition (C&D) material was disposed off-site during the reporting month.

No waste was generated from other contracts during the reporting period.

No exceedances of the Action and Limit Levels were recorded in the reporting period.

 

6        Chinese White Dolphin Monitoring

6.1      CWD Monitoring Requirements

In accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual, CWD monitoring by small vessel line-transect survey supplemented by land-based theodolite tracking should be conducted during construction phase. The monitoring was completed in the reporting period, although there were no marine construction works.

The small vessel line-transect survey as proposed in the Updated EM&A Manual should be conducted at a frequency of two full survey per month while land-based theodolite tracking should be conducted at a frequency of one day per month per station during the construction phase. In addition to the land-based theodolite tracking required for impact monitoring as stipulated in the EM&A Manual, some supplemental theodolite tracking have also been conducted during the initial implementation period for the SkyPier HSF diversion and speed control in order to assist in monitoring the effectiveness of these measures, i.e. in total twice per month at the Sha Chau station and three times per month at the Lung Kwu Chau station.

The Action Level (AL) and Limit Level (LL) for CWD monitoring were formulated by the action response approach using the running quarterly dolphin encounter rates STG and ANI derived from baseline monitoring data, as presented in the CWD Baseline Monitoring Report. The derived values of AL and LL for CWD monitoring were summarized in Table 6.1.

Table 6.1: Derived Values of Action Level (AL) and Limit Level (LL) for Chinese White Dolphin Monitoring

 

NEL, NWL, AW, WL and SWL as a Whole

Action Level

Running quarterly* STG < 1.86 & ANI < 9.35

Limit Level

Two consecutive running quarterly^ (3-month) STG < 1.86 & ANI < 9.35

[Notes for Table 6.1 (referring to the baseline monitoring report):

*Action Level – running quarterly STG & ANI will be calculated from the three preceding survey months. For CWD monitoring for September 2016, data from 1 July to 30 September 2016 will be used to calculate the quarterly encounter rates STG & ANI;

^Limit Level – two consecutive running quarters mean since works commenced on 1 August 2016, the first running quarter for reporting will be 18 May to 17 June 2016, July 2016 to August 2016, and the second running quarter will be July 2016 to September 2016.

AL and/or LL will be exceeded if both STG and ANI fall below the criteria.]

6.2      CWD Monitoring Transects and Stations

6.2.1      Small Vessel Line-transect Survey

Small vessel line-transect surveys were conduct along the transects covering Northeast Lantau (NEL), Northwest Lantau (NWL), Airport West (AW), West Lantau (WL) and Southwest Lantau (SWL), as proposed in the Updated EM&A Manual and being consistent with the AFCD long-term monitoring programme (except AW). The AW transect has not been previously surveyed in the AFCD programme due to the restrictions of HKIA Exclusion Zone, nevertheless, this transect was established during the EIA of the 3RS project with the aim to collect project specific baseline information within the HKIA Approach Area to fill the data gap that was not covered by the AFCD programme. This provided a larger sample size for estimating the densities and patterns of movements in the broader study area of the project.

For the NWL area, there was no physical demarcation of the 3RS works area yet during CWD monitoring survey in the reporting period, therefore the works area of the 3RS project was still accessible and the transect lines followed the waypoints and lengths conducted for baseline monitoring. These transect lines were depicted in Figure 6.1 while the coordinates of all transect lines are shown in Table 6.2.

Table 6.2: Coordinates of Transect Lines in NEL, NWL, AW, WL and SWL Survey Areas

Waypoint

Easting

Northing

Waypoint

Easting

Northing

NEL

1S

813525

820900

6N

818568

824433

1N

813525

824657

7S

819532

821420

2S

814556

818449

7N

819532

824209

2N

814559

824768

8S

820451

822125

3S

815542

818807

8N

820451

823671

3N

815542

824882

9S

821504

822371

4S

816506

819480

9N

821504

823761

4N

816506

824859

10S

822513

823268

5S

817537

820220

10N

822513

824321

5N

817537

824613

11S

823477

823402

6S

818568

820735

11N

823477

824613

NWL

1S

804671

814577

5N

808504

828602

1N

804671

831404

6S

809490

820590

2S

805475

815457

6N

809490

825352

2N

805476

830562

7S

810499

820950

3S

806464

819550

7N

810499

824613

3N

806464

829598

8S

811508

821250

4S

807518

819900

8N

811508

824254

4N

807518

829230

9S

812516

821250

5S

808504

820250

9N

812516

824254

AW

1W

804730

818220

2W

805051

817156

1E

806519

818271

2E

806913

817076

WL

1W

800600

805450

7W

800400

811450

1E

801760

805450

7E

802400

811450

2W

800300

806450

8W

800800

812450

2E

801750

806450

8E

802900

812450

3W

799600

807450

9W

801500

813550

3E

801500

807450

9E

803120

813550

4W

799400

808450

10W

801880

814500

4E

801430

808450

10E

803700

814500

5W

799500

809450

11W

802860

815500

5E

801300

809450

12S/11E

803750

815500

6W

799800

810450

12N

803750

818500

6E

801400

810450

 

 

 

SWL

1S

802494

803961

6S

807467

801137

1N

802494

806174

6N

807467

808458

2S

803489

803280

7S

808553

800329

2N

803489

806720

7N

808553

807377

3S

804484

802509

8S

809547

800338

3N

804484

807048

8N

809547

807396

4S

805478

802105

9S

810542

800423

4N

805478

807556

9N

810542

807462

5S

806473

801250

10S

811446

801335

5N

806473

808458

10N

811446

809436

6.2.2      Land-based Theodolite Tracking

Land-based theodolite tracking stations were set up at two locations, one facing east/south/west on the southern slopes of Sha Chau (SC), and the other facing north/northeast/northwest at Lung Kwu Chau. The stations (D and E) are depicted in Figure 6.2 and shown in Table 6.3 with position coordinates, height of station and approximate distance of consistent theodolite tracking capabilities for CWD.

Table 6.3: Land-based Survey Station Details

Stations

Location

Geographical Coordinates

Station Height (m)

Approximate Tracking Distance (km)

D

Sha Chau (SC)

22° 20’ 43.5” N

113° 53’ 24.66” E

45.66

2

E

Lung Kwu Chau (LKC)

22° 22’ 44.83” N

113° 53’ 0.2” E

70.40

3

6.3      CWD Monitoring Methodology

6.3.1      Small Vessel Line-transect Survey

Small vessel line-transect surveys provided data for density and abundance estimation and other assessments using distance-sampling methodologies, specifically, line-transect methods.

The surveys involved small vessel line-transect data collection and have been designed to be similar to, and consistent with, previous surveys for the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) for their long-term monitoring of small cetaceans in Hong Kong. The survey was designed to provide systematic, quantitative measurements of density, abundance and habitat use.

As mentioned in Section 6.2.1, the transects covered Northeast Lantau (NEL), Northwest Lantau (NWL) covering the Airport West (AW), West Lantau (WL) and Southwest Lantau (SWL) as proposed in the Updated EM&A Manual and are consistent with the AFCD long-term monitoring programme (except AW). There are two types of transect lines:

    Primary transect lines: the parallel and zigzag transect lines as shown in Figure 6.1; and

    Secondary transect lines: transect lines connecting between the primary transect lines and crossing islands.

All on-effort data collected under conditions of Beaufort 0-3 and visibility of approximately 1200 m or beyond, on both primary and secondary transect lines, were used for analysis.

A 15-20 m vessel with a flying bridge observation platform about 4 to 5 m above water level and unobstructed forward view, and a team of three to four observers were deployed to undertake the surveys.  Two observers were on search effort at all times when following the transect lines with a constant speed of 7 to 8 knots (i.e. 13 to 15 km per hour), one using 7X handheld binoculars and the other using unaided eyes and recording data.

During on-effort survey periods, the survey team recorded effort data including time, position (waypoints), weather conditions (Beaufort sea state and visibility) and distance travelled in each series with assistance of a handheld GPS device. The GPS device also continuously and automatically logged data including time, position (Latitude and longitude) and vessel speed throughout the entire survey.

When CWDs were seen, the survey team was taken off-effort, the dolphins were approached and photographed for photo-ID information (using a Canon 7D [or similar] camera and long 300 mm+ telephoto lens), then followed until they left the study area or were lost.  At that point, the boat returned (off effort) to the next survey line and began to survey on effort again. 

Focal follows of dolphins were conducted where practicable (i.e. when individual dolphins or small stable groups of dolphins with at least one member that could be readily identifiable with unaided eyes during observations and weather conditions are favourable).  These involved the boat following (at an appropriate distance to minimize disturbance) an identifiable individual dolphin for an extended period of time, and collecting detailed data on its location, behaviour, response to vessels, and associates.

6.3.2      Photo Identification

Chinese White Dolphins can be identified by their unique features like presence of scratches, nick marks, cuts, wounds, deformities of their dorsal fin and distinguished colouration and spotting patterns.

When CWDs were observed, the survey team was taken off-effort, the dolphins were approached and photographed for photo-ID information (using a Canon 7D [or similar] camera and long 300 mm+ telephoto lens). The survey team attempted to photo both sides of every single dolphin in the group as the colouration and spotting pattern on both sides may not be identical. The photos were taken at the highest available resolution and stored on Compact Flash memory cards for transferring into a computer.

All photos taken were initially examined to sort out those containing potentially identifiable individuals. These sorted-out images would then be examined in detail and compared to the CWD photo-identification catalogue established for 3RS during the baseline monitoring stage.

6.3.3      Land-based Theodolite Tracking

Land-based monitoring obtains fine-scale information on the time of day and movement patterns of the CWDs.  A digital theodolite (Sokkia/Sokkisha Model DT5 or similar equipment) with 30-power magnification and 5-s precision was used to obtain the vertical and horizontal angle of each dolphin and vessel position. Angles were converted to geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude) and data were recorded using Pythagoras software, Version 1.2. This method delivers precise positions of multiple spatially distant targets in a short amount of time.  The technique is fully non-invasive, and allows for time and cost-effective descriptions of dolphin habitat use patterns at all times of daylight.

Three surveyors (one theodolite operator, one computer operator, and one observer) were involved in each survey. Observers searched for dolphins using unaided eyes and handheld binoculars (7X50). Theodolite tracking sessions were initiated whenever an individual CWD or group of CWDs was located.  Where possible, a distinguishable individual was selected, based on colouration, within the group.  The focal individual was then continuously tracked via the theodolite, with a position recorded each time the dolphin surfaced. In case an individual could not be positively distinguished from other members, the group was tracked by recording positions based on a central point within the group whenever the CWD surfaced. Tracking continued until animals were lost from view, moved beyond the range of reliable visibility (>1-3 km, depending on station height), or environmental conditions obstructed visibility (e.g., intense haze, Beaufort sea state >4, or sunset), at which time the research effort was terminated.  In addition to the tracking of CWD, all vessels that moved within 2-3 km of the station were tracked, with effort made to obtain at least two positions for each vessel.

Theodolite tracking included focal follows of CWD groups and vessels. Priority was given to tracking individual or groups of CWD. The survey team also attempted to track all vessels moving within 1 km of the focal CWD.

6.4      Monitoring Results and Observations

6.4.1      Small Vessel Line-transect Survey

Survey Effort

Within the monitoring month of September 2016, two complete sets of small vessel line-transect surveys were conducted on the 5th, 6th, 8th, 19th, 20th, 22nd, 26th and 27th September 2016, covering all transects in NEL, NWL, AW, WL and SWL survey area for twice.

A total of 470.09 km of survey effort was collected from these surveys, with around 97.3% of the total survey effort being conducted under favourable weather condition (i.e. Beaufort Sea State 3 or below with favourable visibility). Details of the survey effort may refer to Appendix D.

Sighting Distribution

In September 2016, 18 groups of CWD with 73 individuals were sighted. Amongst the sightings of CWD, 16 groups with 67 individuals were made during on-effort search under favourable weather condition (i.e. Beaufort Sea State 3 or below with favourable visibility). Details of cetacean sightings are presented in Appendix D.

Distribution of CWD sightings recorded in September 2016 is illustrated in Figure 6.3. The sightings were mainly located east and southwest off Sha Chau and Lung Kwu Chau Marine Park (SCLKCMP) in NWL, near Tai O, Peaked Hill and Fan Tau in WL and along the coast from Fan Lau to Lo Kei Wan in SWL. One sighting was recorded in AW near to the existing Hong Kong International Airport, whilst no sightings of CWDs were recorded within the 3RS land-formation footprint.

 

Figure 6.3: Sightings Distribution of Chinese White Dolphins

[Pink circle: Sighting locations of CWD, White line: Vessel survey transects, Blue polygon: Sha Chau and Lung Kwu Chau Marine Park (SCLKCMP), Red polygon: 3RS land-formation footprint]

Note: Only on-effort sightings under Beaufort 3 or below were presented in the figure.

Encounter Rate

Two types of dolphin encounter rates were calculated based on the data from September 2016. They included the number of dolphin sightings per 100km survey effort (STG) and total number of dolphins per 100km survey effort (ANI) in the whole survey area (i.e. NEL, NWL, AW, WL and SWL). In the calculation of dolphin encounter rates, only survey data collected under favourable weather condition (i.e. Beaufort Sea State 3 or below with favourable visibility) were used. Formulations of the encounter rates are shown as below:

Encounter Rate of Number of Dolphin Sightings (STG)

 

Encounter Rate of Number of Dolphins (ANI)

(Notes:    Only data collected under Beaufort 3 or below condition was used)

In September 2016, a total of 457.32 km of survey effort was collected under Beaufort Sea State 3 or below with favourable visibility, whilst total number of 16 on-effort sightings and total number of 67 dolphins from on-effort sightings were collected under such condition. Calculation of the encounter rates in September 2016 are shown as below:

Encounter Rate of Number of Dolphin Sightings (STG) in September 2016

Encounter Rate of Number of Dolphins (ANI) in September 2016

For the reporting month, in the running quarter a total of 1282.77 km of survey effort was collected under Beaufort Sea State 3 or below with favourable visibility, whilst total number of 55 on-effort sightings and total number of 235 dolphins from on-effort sightings were collected under such condition. Calculation of the running quarterly encounter rates are shown as below:

Running Quarterly Encounter Rate of Number of Dolphin Sightings (STG)

Running Quarterly Encounter Rate of Number of Dolphins (ANI)

The STG and ANI of CWD in the whole survey area (i.e. NEL, NWL, AW, WL and SWL) of September 2016 and the running quarterly STG and ANI calculated from the three preceding survey months are presented in Table 6.4 below.

Table 6.4: STG and ANI of Chinese White Dolphin of the Whole Survey Area in September 2016 and Running Quarterly STG and ANI

 

Encounter Rate (STG)

Encounter Rate (ANI)

September 2016

3.50

14.65

Running Quarterly*

4.29

18.32

*Running quarterly encounter rates STG & ANI for reporting were calculated from the three preceding survey months, i.e. the data in July 2016, August 2016 and September 2016 containing six sets of transect surveys for all monitoring areas.

Group Size

In September 2016, the average group size of CWDs was 4.2 individuals per group. The number of CWD sightings with small group size (i.e. 1-2 individuals) and that with medium group size (3-9 individuals) were similar. One large CWD groups with 10 individuals was sighted in WL.

Activities and Association with Fishing Boats

A group of four CWDs was sighted in association with operating purse seiner near Tai O in September 2016.

Mother-calf Pair

No mother-calf pairs were sighted in September 2016.

6.4.2      Photo Identification

In September 2016, a total number of 37 different CWD individuals were identified. Amongst these 37 identified individuals, eight (NLMM005, NLMM010, WLMM007, WLMM025, WLMM027, WLMM054, SLMM022 and SLMM030) were sighted twice and one (SLMM002) was sighted three times in September. A summary of photo identification works is presented in Table 6.5. Representative photos of these individuals may refer to Appendix D.

Table 6.5: Summary of Photo Identification

Individual ID

No. of times sighted

Date of sighting (yyyymmdd)

Individual ID

No. of times sighted

Date of sighting (yyyymmdd)

NLMM002

1

20160922

SLMM051

1

20160926

NLMM005

2

20160922

WLMM007

2

20160919

NLMM006

1

20160922

WLMM015

1

20160919

NLMM010

2

20160906

20160922

WLMM020

1

20160919

NLMM012

1

20160908

WLMM024

1

20160919

NLMM013

1

20160922

WLMM025

2

20160919

NLMM017

1

20160908

WLMM027

2

20160908

20160927

NLMM021

1

20160927

WLMM043

1

20160908

NLMM027

1

20160922

WLMM050

1

20160908

NLMM028

1

20160922

WLMM051

1

20160908

SLMM002

3

20160919

20160926

WLMM052

1

20160908

SLMM010

1

20160919

WLMM053

1

20160908

SLMM015

1

20160927

WLMM054

2

20160908

20160927

SLMM017

1

20160926

WLMM055

1

20160919

SLMM022

2

20160919

WLMM056

1

20160919

SLMM030

2

20160919

WLMM057

1

20160919

SLMM032

1

20160919

WLMM058

1

20160919

SLMM034

1

20160919

WLMM059

1

20160919

SLMM050

1

20160926

 

 

 

 

6.4.3      Land-based Theodolite Tracking

Survey Effort

Land-based theodolite tracking surveys at Lung Kwu Chau were conducted on 1st , 7th and 26th  September 2016 and at Sha Chau on 13th and  23rd September 2016, with a total of 5 days of land-based theodolite tracking survey effort have been accomplished in September 2016. In total, nine CWD groups were tracked during the surveys. Information of survey effort and CWD groups sighted during these land-based theodolite tracking surveys are presented in Table 6.6. Details of the survey effort and CWD groups tracked are presented in Appendix D. The first sighting locations of CWD groups tracked at LKC station during land-based theodolite tracking surveys in September 2016 were depicted in Figure 6.4. No CWD group was sighted from SC station in this reporting month.

Table 6.6: Summary of Survey Effort and CWD Group of Land-based Theodolite Tracking

Land-based Station

# of Survey Sessions

Survey Effort (hh:mm)

# CWD Groups Sighted

CWD Group Sighting per Survey Hour

Lung Kwu Chau

3

18:00

9

0.5

Sha Chau

2

12:00

0

0

TOTAL

5

30:00

9

0.3

Figure 6.4: Plots of First Sightings of All CWD Groups obtained from Land-based Stations

[Green triangle: LKC station; Green square: CWD group off LKC; Blue line: SCLKCMP boundary]

6.5      Progress Update on Passive Acoustic Monitoring

Underwater acoustic monitoring using Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) should also be undertaken within the whole duration for land formation related construction works. An Ecological Acoustic Recorder (EAR) has been deployed and positioned at south of Sha Chau Island with 20% duty cycle (Figure 6.5). The EAR deployment is generally last for 4-6 weeks prior to data retrieval as one batch of data collection for analysis. Acoustic data will be gathered to listen for CWDs occurrence patterns and to obtain anthropogenic noise information simultaneously. Analysis (by a specialized team of acousticians) involved manually browsing through every acoustic recording and logging the occurrence of dolphin signals. All data will be re-played by computer and listened to by human ears for accurate assessment of dolphin group presence. As the period of data collection and analysis takes more than two months, PAM results could not be reported in monthly intervals.

6.6      Site Audit for CWD-related Mitigation Measures

 No marine construction works was carried out during the reporting period. Audits of acoustic decoupling for construction vessels were carried out.  Marine mammal watching and dolphin exclusion zone implementation were not applicable during this reporting period.

Audits of SkyPier High Speed Ferries route diversion and speed control and construction vessel management are presented in Section 7.2 and Section 7.3 respectively.

6.7      Timing of Reporting CWD Monitoring Results

For indication, detailed analysis of CWD monitoring results collected by small vessel line-transect survey will be provided in future quarterly reports. Detailed analysis of CWD monitoring results collected by land-based theodolite tracking and PAM will be provided in future yearly reports when  a larger sample size of data has been collected.

6.8      Summary of CWD Monitoring

CWD monitoring was conducted as scheduled.  As no marine construction works was carried out during the reporting period, no adverse impact arised from the project was observed.

 

7        Environmental Site Inspection and Audit

7.1      Environmental Site Inspection

Weekly site inspection of the construction works for P560(R) and CLP cable diversion enabling works were carried out by the ET to monitor the implementation of proper environmental pollution control and mitigation measures for the Project. The weekly site inspection schedule of the construction works is provided in Appendix C. Bi-weekly site inspections were also conducted by the Project’s Independent Environmental Checker (IEC).  Observations have been recorded in the site inspection checklists and passed to the Contractor together with the appropriate recommended mitigation measures where necessary.

The key observations from site inspection and associated recommendations were related to the review of the capacity of chemical waste storage area, better maintenance of drip tray for chemical containers, display of Environmental Permit at site entrance, erection of site hoarding, provision of sandbags around the gully to prevent surface runoff and improvement of dust mitigation measures.

A summary of implementation status of the environmental mitigation measures for the construction phase of the Project during the reporting period is provided in Appendix A.

7.2      Audit of Route Diversion and Speed Control of the SkyPier High Speed Ferries

The Marine Travel Routes and Management Plan for High Speed Ferries of SkyPier (the SkyPier Plan) has been submitted to the Advisory Council on the Environment (ACE) for comment and subsequently submitted to and approved by EPD in November 2015 under EP Condition 2.10. The approved SkyPier Plan is available on the dedicated website of the Project. In the SkyPier Plan, AAHK committed to implementing the mitigation measure of requiring high speed ferries (HSFs) of SkyPier travelling between HKIA and Zhuhai / Macau to start diverting the route with an associated speed control across an area (i.e. Speed Control Zone (SCZ)) with high Chinese White Dolphin (CWD) abundance.  The route diversion and speed restriction at the SCZ have been implemented since 28 December 2015.

Key audit findings for the SkyPier HSFs travelling to/from Zhuhai and Macau against the requirements of the SkyPier Plan during the reporting period are summarized in Table 7.1.  The daily movements of all SkyPier HSFs in September 2016 were within the maximum daily cap number (i.e. 87 to 95 daily movements, which are within maximum daily cap of 125 daily movements). Status of compliance with annual daily average of 99 movements will be further reviewed in the annual EM&A Report.

In total, 814 ferry movements between HKIA SkyPier and Zhuhai / Macau were recorded in September 2016 and the data are presented in Appendix G. The time spent for the SkyPier HSFs travelled through the SCZ in September were presented in Figure 7‑1.  It will take 9.6 minutes to travel through the SCZ when the SkyPier HSFs adopt the maximum allowed speed of 15-knot within the SCZ.  Figure 7‑1 shows that all the SkyPier HSFs spent more than 9.6 minutes to travel through the SCZ.

Figure 7‑1 Duration of the SkyPier HSFs travelled through the SCZ for 1 – 30 September 2016

One ferry movement was recorded with minor deviation of diverted route on 5 September 2016. Notice was sent to the ferry operators and the investigation results revealed that the case is related to safety / emergency situation presented as follow:

    Case on 5 September 2016: HSF captain reported that he had to give way to other vessels for safety reason which causes the minor route deviation. Then the HSF returned to the normal route following the SkyPier Plan.

Cases of minor route deviation on 14, 26 and 28 August 2016 have been followed up. For the case on 14 August 2016, the Ferry Operator reported that it was the first time the  concerned HSF travelled through the diverted route, and they discovered some inaccuracy of the plot of Speed Control Zone in the radar graph. After that, they have checked and corrected the coordinates of Speed Control Zone in both the radar graph and electronic marine chart. 

For the cases on 26 and 28 August 2016, investigation found that the vessel captain was required to give way to other vessels for safety reason, which causes the minor route deviation within the Speed Control Zone. After that, the HSF returned to the normal route following the SkyPier Plan.

Table 7.1: Summary of Key Audit Findings against the SkyPier Plan

Requirements in the SkyPier Plan

1 September to 30 September 2016

Total number of ferry movements recorded and audited

814

Use diverted route and enter / leave SCZ through Gate Access Points

1 deviation , which is related to safety / emergency situation

Speed control in speed control zone

The prevailing speed (the average speed taken within the SCZ) of all HSFs were within 15 knots (7.8 knots to 14.4knots), which complied with the SkyPier Plan. The time used by HSF to travel through SCZ is presented in Figure 7‑1.

Daily Cap (including all SkyPier HSFs)             

 

87 to 95 daily movements (within maximum daily cap  - 125 daily movements)

7.3      Audit of Construction and Associated Vessels

The Marine Travel Routes and Management Plan for Construction and Associated Vessel (MTRMP-CAV) has been submitted and approved in December 2015 by EPD under EP Condition 2.9. The approved Plan is available on the dedicated website of the Project.

ET has carried out the following actions during the reporting month:

·         7 skipper trainings have been held with 4 DCM and P560(R) contractors’ concerned skippers of construction vessels associated with construction works to familiarise them with the predefined routes, general education on local cetaceans, guidelines for avoiding adverse water quality impact, the required environmental practices / measures while operating construction and associated vessels under the Project, and guidelines for operating vessels safely in the presence of CWDs.

·         Trainings have also been held with the 4 DCM and P560(R) contractor senior management staff to strengthen the commiunication between senior management and the sub-contractor and facilitating them in familiarise with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV.

·         A Marine Management Liaison Group (MMLG) has been set up and provided a forum to assist and resolve any marine issues which may be encountered under 3RS project. ET has participated in the 2nd MMLG meeting which was held on 26 September 2016.

The ET worked with the new contractors in mobilising for the 3RS works on reviewing and facilitating them in familiarise with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV.

In September, ET has conducted weekly audit of relevant information, including AIS data, vessel tracks and other relevant records  to ensure sufficient information has been provided by the contractors to the Marine Traffic Control Center (MTCC) and the contractors are fully complied with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV. The contactors have been reminded to submit the endorsed vessel 3-month programme to MTCC for the review of keeping the number of construction vessels to a practicable minimum. The IEC of the Project has also performed audit on the compliance of the requirements as part of the EM&A programme.

7.4      Ecological Monitoring

In accordance with the Updated EM&A Manual, ecological monitoring shall be undertaken monthly at the HDD daylighting location on Sheung Sha Chau Island to identify and evaluate any impacts with appropriate actions taken as required to address and minimise any adverse impact found. Monthly ecological monitoring on Sheung Sha Chau Island observed that site preparation work was conducted at Sheung Sha Chau and there was no encroachment or disturbance to the egretry area at Sheung Sha Chau by the works.

7.5      Status of Submissions under Environmental Permits

The current status of submissions under the EP up to the reporting period is presented in Table 7.2.

Table 7.2: Status of Submissions under Environmental Permit

EP Condition

Submission

Status

2.1

Complaint Management Plan

Accepted / approved by EPD

2.4

Management Organizations

2.5

Construction Works Schedule and Location Plans

2.7

Marine Park Proposal

2.8

Marine Ecology Conservation Plan

2.9

Marine Travel Routes and Management Plan for Construction and Associated Vessels

2.10

Marine Travel Routes and Management Plan for High Speed Ferries of SkyPier

2.11

Marine Mammal Watching Plan

2.12

Coral Translocation Plan

2.13

Fisheries Management Plan

2.14

Egretry Survey Plan

2.15

Silt Curtain Deployment Plan

2.17

Detailed Plan on Deep Cement Mixing

2.16

Spill Response Plan

2.19

Waste Management Plan

3.1

Updated EM&A Manual

3.4

Baseline Monitoring Reports

7.6      Compliance with Other Statutory Environmental Requirements

During the reporting period, environmental related licenses and permits required for the construction activities were checked. No non-compliance with environmental statutory requirements was recorded. The environmental licenses and permits which are valid in the reporting month are presented in Appendix E.

7.7      Analysis and Interpretation of Complaints, Notification of Summons and Status of Prosecutions

7.7.1      Complaints

During the reporting period, no construction activities related complaints were received.

7.7.2      Notifications of Summons or Status of Prosecution

During the reporting period, neither notifications of summons nor prosecution were received.

7.7.3      Cumulative Statistics

Cumulative statistics on complaints, notifications of summons and status of prosecutions are summarized in Appendix F.

 

 

8        Future Key Issues and Other EIA & EM&A Issues

8.1      Construction Programme for the Coming Reporting Period

Key activities anticipated in the next reporting period for the Project will be under the following contracts including:

Advance works Contract:

Contract P560 (R) Aviation Fuel Pipeline Diversion Works

    HDD pilot hole drilling;

    Stockpiling of excavated materials from HDD operation; and

    Construction of containment pit at Sheung Sha Chau.

 

DCM Contracts:

Contract 3201 to 3204 Deep Cement Mixing Works

    Laying of geotextile and sand blanket.

 

Other Contracts:

Contract 3213 CLP Cable Diversion Enabling Works

    Installation of silt curtain; and

    Removal of existing armour rocks.

8.2      Key Environmental Issues for the Coming Reporting Period

The key environmental issues for the Project in the coming reporting period are expected to be associated with the construction activities include:  

    Generation of dust from construction works and stockpiles;

    Noise from operating equipment and machinery on-site;

    Generation of site surface runoffs and wastewater from activities on-site;

    Water quality from laying of sand blankets

    Sorting, recycling, storage and disposal of general refuse and construction waste;

    Management of chemicals and avoidance of oil spillage on-site; and

    Acoustic decoupling measures for equipment on marine vessel.

The implementation of required mitigation measures by the Contractor will be monitored by the ET.

8.3      Monitoring Schedule for the Coming Reporting Period

A tentative schedule of the planned environmental monitoring work in the next reporting period is provided in Appendix C.

 

9        Conclusion and Recommendation

Key activities of the Project carried out in the reporting month were related to Contract P560(R) which involved drilling of HDD pilot hole at launching site, stockpiling of excavated materials from HDD operation at stockpiling area, site preparation works and construction of containment pit at Sheung Sha Chau. Works under the four DCM contracts involved site survey and investigation works, and CLP cable diversion enabling work involved site preparation works.  Some other site investigation works were also carried out during the reporting period.

Construction dust, noise, waste and ecological monitoring were carried out in the reporting period.

The water quality monitoring and CWD monitoring were completed as scheduled although no marine construction works was carried out during the reporting period.

Three exceedance cases involving Action Level of 1-hour TSP monitoring were recorded during the reporting period. The investigation results indicated that the exceedances were likely related to background air quality level but not project-related.

No breach of the Action or Limit Levels in relation to the construction noise, waste, ecological monitoring were recorded in the reporting month.  All site observations made by the ET were recorded in the site inspection checklists and passed to the Contractor together with the recommended follow-up actions.

On the implementation of the SkyPier Plan, the daily movements of all SkyPier High Speed Ferries (HSFs) in September 2016 were 87 to 95 daily movements, which are within the maximum daily cap of 125 daily movements.  A total of 814 HSF movements under SkyPier Plan were recorded. All HSFs had travelled through the SCZ with prevailing speed under 15 knots (7.8 to 14.4 knots) in compliance with the SkyPier Plan. One ferry movement had minor deviation from the diverted route which is related to safety / emergency situation. In summary, the ET and IEC have audited the HSF movements against the SkyPier Plan and conducted follow up investigation or actions accordingly.

On the implementation of the Marine Travel Routes and Management Plan for Construction and Associated Vessel (MTRMP-CAV), ET has conducted weekly audit of relevant information, including AIS data, vessel tracks and other relevant records to ensure full compliance with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV. Trainings have been held with the Contractor senior management staff and concerned skippers to facilitating them in familiarise with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV and strengthen the communication between senior management staff and the sub-contractors. The ET is also working with contractors to familiarise with the requirements of the MTRMP-CAV.