Contents

1                      Introduction and Context

1.1                   Background

1.2                   Objectives of the Landscape & Visual Plan

1.3                   Scope of the Initial Landscape and Visual Plan

1.4                   Structure of this Initial Landscape & Visual Plan

2                      Design Codes, Standards and Bench Marks

2.1                   Relevant Legislation, Codes and Standards

2.2                   Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures from EIAO Process                                                             

2.3                   International Benchmarks & Best Practices

2.4                   Design Quality Criteria & Broad Brush Targets

3                      Aesthetic Architectural Designs for Building Structures & Facilities

3.1                   Third Runway Concourse (TRC)

4                      Tree Treatment and Massed Planting Proposals

4.1                   Tree Treatment

4.2                   Implementation Programme, Maintenance and Management Schedules

5                      implementation of landscape and visual mitigation measures

 

Annex A        Hong Kong Regulatory Framework

Annex B         Landscape Design & Relevant Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures from EIAO Process

Annex C        International Standards and Best Practice – Airport Landscape Design

Annex D         Preliminary Greening Measures / Mitigation Measures specified in Approved EIA Report

Annex E         Indicative Greenery Coverage Plans and Preliminary Parameters for T2 Expansion

Annex F          Preliminary Architectural Design and Preliminary Parameters of TRC

Annex G         Trees Assessment Schedule

Annex H        Potential Conflicts between Existing Trees and 3RS Works

Annex I           Generic Tree Protection Plan

Annex J          Landscape Survey & Recommendations (Tree Treatments) Plans

Annex K         Recipient Locations for Transplanted Trees

Annex L          Typical Tree Transplantation Specification

Annex M         3RS Compensatory Tree Estimates Plan

Annex N         Photo Records of “Retain” and “Transplant” Trees

 

Addendum

                       

 

1                            Introduction and Context

1.1                             Background

The Airport Authority Hong Kong (“AAHK”) is responsible for operation of the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA).  The HKIA Master Plan 2030 (MP2030) recommended expansion of HKIA into a three-runway system (3RS) (“the Project”) as the best way forward to cope with the projected increase in air traffic demand and to secure the continual growth of HKIA operation for the benefit of the economic development of Hong Kong.  This development option for HKIA received approval in principle from the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) on 20 March 2012.

An Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Study Report for the Project was prepared in accordance with the study brief requirements (ESB-250/2012) issued by the Environmental Protection Department (EPD).  The EIA Report for the Project (Register No. AEIAR-185/2014) was approved by the EPD on 7 November 2014 and the Environmental Permit (EP) (EP No. EP-489/2014) granted on 7 November 2014.

According to Environmental Permit (EP-489/2014) Condition 2.18, the AAHK shall ‘no later than 3 months before the commencement of construction works on the formed land of the Project’…submit a…‘‘Landscape and Visual Plan (L&V Plan)…to specify quality criteria on the overall landscape and visual environment of the Project with broad-brush targets to be achieved for greening and planting as benchmarked against international standards and best practises….The L&V Plan shall include at least the following information:

·       aesthetic architectural designs for building structures and facilities;

·       locations, size, number and plant species of trees to be transplanted and their final transplanting locations;

·       locations, size, number and plant species to be felled;

·       locations, size, number and plant species to be provided or compensated; and

·       implementation programme, maintenance and management schedules.”

1.2                             Objectives of the Landscape & Visual Plan

This L&V Plan submission is prepared in fulfilment of Specific Condition 2.18 of Environmental Permit (EP-489/2014) and sets out to:

·         Specify quality criteria on the overall landscape and visual environment of the Project with broad-brush targets to be achieved for greening and planting as benchmarked against international standards and best practices;

·         Describe the architectural design for building structures and facilities and show how they meet the broad-brush targets and mitigation measures set out in the EIA;

·         Describe the proposals for massed tree transplantation, felling and compensation to show how the broad-brush targets and mitigation measures set out in the EIA are being achieved; and

·         Set out the implementation, maintenance and management schedule so that it is coordinated effectively and in accordance with measures set out in the EIA.

The L&V Plan submission is required no later than 3 months before the commencement of construction works on the formed land of the 3RS Project (see Section 1.1 above).  To fulfil this commitment, a preliminary L&V Plan was formally submitted to EPD on 28 December 2018, 3 months in advance of the construction commencement on formed land.  The early submission required by EP Specific Condition 2.18 has presented challenges in terms of ability to provide required L&V content in sufficient detail due to the detailed design process for relevant 3RS facilities, infrastructure and landscaping design not yet being completed (noting the 3RS project is only scheduled to commence operations in 2024). 

This Initial Revised L&V Plan submission is therefore intended to update the detail provided in the December 2018 preliminary submission and is based on design information and planning details available at the time of preparation. A Final L&V Plan will be submitted around the end of 2022, after 3RS buildings and infrastructure detailed designs and associated landscaping design are expected to be completed.  To align with the expected slower passenger growth in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, AAHK has been considering a possible flexible phasing plan for the commissioning of some portions of the 3RS passenger facilities from 2024 onwards and it should be noted that this may delay the completion of some detailed designs.  The Final L&V Plan will include relevant updates to the information presented in this initial revised plan as well as additional required details, not limited to the following:

·         Presentation of appropriate landscape and visual details for the 3RS Project, including conceptual plans/ drawings and photomontages on general greening and design arrangements for the Terminal 2 (T2) Expansion, the Third Runway Concourse (TRC) and for other representative buildings and facilities (e.g. showing site area, site coverage, disposition of buildings and building height were appropriate) as well as overview details on committed 3RS Project L&V mitigation measures.

·         Updated presentation of visual aspect details not limited to:

-          Detailed conceptual plans/ drawings, photomontages illustrating/ identifying the landscape and visual mitigation measures of the 3RS Project;

-          Perspective drawings and photomontages demonstrating the aesthetic architectural designs of T2 Expansion and TRC with the detail presented emphasising the interface between external and surrounding landscapes;

-          General depiction of greening and design arrangements for representative planned structures in addition to the T2 Expansion and TRC;

-          Location and details of internal landscapes within internal buildings; and

-          Overall Key Plan for the whole 3RS project area and relevant information regarding to the proposed mitigation measures in the Master Landscape Plan

·         A full update including illustrations on greening measures and their extent across the 3RS Project, not limited to greening of external areas such as airside turf greening, roadside and amenity planting, and other greening area details such as at grade greening and internal space greening, vertical greening, roof top greening, screen and indoor planting;

·         A full update on status of achievement of landscape and visual mitigation measures including an overall mitigation measures plan and relevant blow outs (with appropriate scale) to better identify relevant mitigation measures; and

·         A full update on tree management aspects including details on tree compensation such as tree species, quantity, planting locations, plant spacing and soiling detail as appropriate.

1.3                             Scope of the Initial Landscape and Visual Plan

The site area for 3RS Project landscape and visual aspects matches the area captured in the “Landscape and Visual Mitigation Arrangement Plan – CLK” (Figure MCL/P132/EIA/15-028.1 (Rev.C)) as presented in the EIA.  The specific focus of EIA / EP landscape and visual mitigation measures and commitments extends to the new reclaimed land area (covering the Western Support Area (WSA), Eastern Support Area (ESA), the TRC, the Apron and new Airfield areas), the T2 expansion and the associated APM and BHS infrastructure developments on the existing airport island and the existing north runway area, which will be closed for substantive modification works while construction activities for the TRC and aprons, vehicle tunnels and reconfiguration of T2 are ongoing

The anticipated road alterations identified for the existing southern cargo area and in the western area of the existing airport are not under planning at this time and associated L&V commitments for these areas are not considered further in this plan.  Should the road alterations go ahead, the LMMs in these areas will then be addressed in the Final L&V Plan to be submitted around the end of 2022 when detailed designs are expected to be completed, subject to the possible flexible phasing plans for commissioning of some portions of the 3RS passenger facilities due to expected slower passenger growth.  In the event that detailed designs are not completed by the time of the Final L&V Plan submission, the final plan will be further updated in due course.  Figure 1.1.  “Coverage of 3RS Key Project Components” defines the focus area of the 3RS Project L&V effort.

The new 3RS airfield areas and many of the associated 3RS Project ancillary buildings, facilities and supporting infrastructure have limited potential for the incorporation of significant landscape and visual elements into their designs, principally because of the functional nature airport facilities and supporting infrastructure in the operational airport setting. 

The T2 Expansion on the existing airport island and the new TRC on the newly formed land area are the key 3RS developments with significant aesthetic architectural design opportunities.  These major 3RS Project buildings are therefore the main focus of Chapter 3 of this plan and available details are included on aesthetic architectural designs for these key building structures and associated facilities.  Updated full L&V detail on the T2 Expansion and the TRC will be presented around the end of 2022 after respective detailed designs are complete along with a general description of greening and design arrangements for some other representative 3RS Project ancillary buildings and facilities, subject to the possible flexible phasing plans for commissioning of some portions of the 3RS passenger facilities.  Chapter 4 focuses on the treatment of trees and tree management across the 3RS Project as a whole.  Chapter 5 provides details on the implementation of the proposed landscape and visual mitigation measures in the form of an implementation schedule.

1.4                             Structure of this Initial Landscape & Visual Plan

The structure of the Initial L&V Plan is as follows:

Chapter 1 -   Introduction and Context

Chapter 2 - Design Codes and Standards – Including the Local Regulatory Framework, information regarding International Benchmarking and the Recommended Design Quality Criteria and Broad Brush Targets.

Chapter 3 -   Provides a description of the aesthetic architectural designs for building structures and facilities, focusing on the T2 Expansion and the TRC.

Chapter 4 - Consolidates information on the Project’s treatment of trees, including trees being retained, transplanted or felled along with compensatory tree planting detail.  The implementation program is also covered, including maintenance and management schedules.

Chapter 5 -   Outlines the proposed landscape and visual mitigation measures to be implemented, including the implementation agent, location, timing and status. 

Annex A –      Hong Kong Regulatory Framework

Annex B –       Landscape Design & Relevant Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures from EIAO Process

Annex C –      International Standards & Best Practice– Airport Landscape Design

Annex D ([1])   Demonstration of Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures specified in approved EIA Report

Annex E (1) –  Landscape and Visual Design and Detailed Parameters for T2 Expansion

Annex F (1) –  Master Landscape Plan and Detailed Parameters for TRC

Annex G –       Trees Assessment Schedule

Annex H –       Potential Conflicts between Existing Trees and 3RS Works

Annex I –         Generic Tree Protection Plans

Annex J –        Tree Treatments Plans

Annex K –       Recipient Locations for Transplanted Trees

Annex L –        Typical Tree Transplantation Specification

Annex M –       3RS Compensatory Tree Plans

Annex N –       Photo Records of “Retain” and “Transplant” Trees

 

 

 

2                            Design Codes, Standards and Bench Marks

This chapter sets out the legislation, codes and standards of relevance to this Plan.  A comprehensive review of available and relevant international standards and/or best practices relating to the landscape and visual environment of an airport setting was also conducted, with quality criteria and broad brush targets for the Project recommended.

2.1                             Relevant Legislation, Codes and Standards

Annex A summarises the Hong Kong legislation, codes and standards that are of relevance to this Plan.  In addition, HKIA has an established planting scheme in place; the airport island is generally divided into distinct zones according to distance from runways and land use (Figure 2.1), with all planting required to adhere to the Approved Plant Species List (APSL).  The APSL serves as a guide for project proponents on HKIA when planting proposals are under consideration for different areas on the airport island and aims to strike a balance between aviation safety and landscape attractiveness, both within the airport boundary and in its close vicinity.

2.2                             Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures from EIAO Process

Landscape and visual mitigation measures from the EIAO process are detailed in Annex B, which provides a review of the Project landscape design against these landscape and visual mitigation measures, summarising how they are considered and integrated into the Project.

2.3                             International Benchmarks & Best Practices

An extensive review of international standards and best practices has been conducted focusing on landscape master planning in relation to the design of airports around the world and considering other relevant information such as architectural awards and general guidelines on airport design (See Annex C).  Some international standards for airport environmental planning do exist, but are primarily focused on noise, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions and improving efficiency to reduce use of natural resources.  In particular the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) ([2]) includes ‘Environmental Protection’ amongst its five strategic objectives ([3]), however ICAO documents on Airport Planning and Design aspects do not include specific standards for landscape design criteria or greening.  Overall the review concluded there are no internationally recognised quality criteria, broad-brush targets, standards or best practices for airport landscapes, although some commonalities across aviation facilities do exist

Since no particular international targets or broad brush targets for landscape or greening requirements have been identified that are relevant to the HKIA context, the Hong Kong regulatory framework has been carefully reviewed to determine guidance or criteria that may be relevant to the HKIA setting, given the clear need to strike a balance between aviation safety and landscape attractiveness and greening. 

Sustainable Building Design Guidelines

The Buildings Department, Practice Note for Authorized Persons, Registered Structural Engineers and Registered Geotechnical Engineers – Sustainable Building Design Guidelines (PNAPP 152), which promulgates guidelines on building design intended to enhance the quality and sustainability of the built environment in Hong Kong, captures recommended practices for aspects including site coverage, with recommendations for greenery targets in different Hong Kong developments.  In particular, PNAPP 152 identifies a general requirement for 30% greenery for developments with a site area equal to or greater than 20,000 m2, while it also recognises there are special circumstances in which genuine difficulties in achieving such coverage may be encountered, including buildings serving special functions.  In the case of the 3RS Project, the PNAPP152 requirement for 30% greenery is not practicable due to the special nature and function of the airport facility, with its significant safety considerations for aeronautical activities. 

BEAM Plus

The AAHK is pursuing a BEAM Plus New Building (NB) certification (Version 1.2) for both the T2 Expansion and the TRC.

BEAM Plus is the leading green building initiative in Hong Kong, and uses independent, third party assessments to determine building sustainability performance, seeking to enhance the environmental performance of new buildings, while also improving user satisfaction.  The BEAM Plus assessment process involves an Independent Assessor considering a comprehensive set of criteria (defined by the BEAM Society Limited - BSL) to assess sustainability performance aspects relating to planning, design, construction, commissioning, management, operation and maintenance of a building.  Some of the assessment criteria are relevant to landscape and greening and these have been considered at the planning and design phases of both the T2 Expansion and TRC.

One of the BEAM Plus criteria as specified in the BEAM Plus NB Version 1.2 Manual requires that project proponents developing typical residential or commercial buildings consider landscaping up to 30% - 40% of the available site area to maximise credits.  Yet, due to the special functional, security and operational needs of the T2 Expansion and TRC within the operating airport environment, it is recognized that the stated percentage planting and greening targets are not suitable for direct application.  This understanding is in line with the recognition, as discussed above, that the PNAPP 152 requirement for 30% greenery is not practicable due to the special nature and function of airport facilities.

2.4                             Design Quality Criteria & Broad Brush Targets

Following the review of international standards and best practices as well as the Hong Kong regulatory framework, design quality criteria for the overall landscape and visual environment of the Project have been developed, with suggested broad-brush targets to help achieve the design quality criteria.  These are set out in Table 2.1.  As noted in Section 2.3, there are no specific, internationally recognized guidelines or standards for landscape design and greening at airports.  Findings from the benchmarking review of international standards and best practice for airport landscape design (see Annex C) identifies that other international airports adopt different greening and planting practices/ approach to best suit their specific and respective local environments and surroundings.  No one particular approach on landscaping and greening adopted at other airports was found to fit the HKIA case, and there is no readily available template to guide the approach for the 3RS Project at HKIA.  However, most of the required landscaping will be in association with the 3RS works footprint on the existing airport land area and a key landscaping aim here will be to tie in with well-established landscape characteristics and themes in place for many years at HKIA, guided by the strict requirements of the APSL with its balance of aviation safety and landscape attractiveness.

It is important to note that the current airport island has extremely limited land availability.  The airport is an intensively used site with the majority of landside areas occupied by various airport infrastructure, transport, commercial and operations support facilities.  With the 3RS development further encroaching into the limited existing two-runway system (2RS) land areas, the available remaining areas that are suitable for greening and landscaping are extremely limited.  Nonetheless, the AAHK is endeavouring to include landscaping features and greenery coverage as far as practicable as detailed design and landscape planning continues; the extent of greening for the area covering 3RS key project components is expected to be around 20% (refer to Figure 2.2 and Figure 2.3 for the coverage of 3RS key project components and greening calculation and Figure 2.4 for the further breakdown of airside turf, roadside planting and amenity planting greening categories).  New landscaping designs associated with 3RS development encroaching into 2RS land areas and in the numerous tree compensation areas are being coordinated to reflect the existing established landscape character and ‘sense of place’ of Hong Kong and the airport location.

3RS Project Greenery

The total area for which a greenery target is being calculated is defined in Figure 1.1 and includes the new reclaimed land area (covering the WSA, ESA, the TRC, the Apron and new Airfield areas), the T2 expansion and the associated APM and BHS infrastructure developments and associated areas on the existing airport island as well as the existing north runway area.

For airport operations related projects, the International Standard and Recommended

Practice, Annex 14 –on the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Section 9.4.4) mentions that any source attracting bird activity shall be prevented (i.e. in order to avoid bird hazard).  Certain types of landscaping and greenery can provide food or shelter that may attract birds into the aerodrome and this may increase the risk of bird hazard, therefore the scale of soft landscaping needs to be controlled for safety reasons.  This understanding is also in line with the provision in paragraph 12 of the “Special Considerations” subsection in PNAP APP-152 Sustainable Building Design Guidelines (SBDG) issued by the Buildings Department (BD).  This section specifically notes that while the SBDG requires at least 30% of greenery coverage for sites with an area ≥20,000m2, it recognizes the genuine difficulties in complying with this requirement for new buildings serving special functions, including terminals, ferry piers and stadia, etc.  Excessive or certain types of greenery/ landscaping in an airport setting can have adverse impacts due to the potential for attracting bird activity, leading to potential aviation hazards.  

 

Nevertheless, greenery areas within the coverage of 3RS key project components captured in Figure 1.1 are expected to comprise around 20% of the project footprint (refer to Figures 2.2 to 2.4 for detail on the size of the entire area, greening categories and overall greening area detail) and will include 3RS land reclamation green areas (e.g. airfield turf areas) and landscape areas around the T2 expansion and the associated APM and BHS infrastructure developments in the existing 2RS land areas (e.g. roadside and amenity planting).  Other greening areas, including vertical greening, roof top greening, screen planting and indoor planting areas, will be confirmed when the detail design stage of key Project components completes around the end of 2022.  It is however noted that building related greening (e.g. green roofs, vertical, indoor or other similar greening) will be classified as internal landscaping and is not counted towards the total 3RS Project greening percentage.  Preliminary greening measures are provided in Annex D for reference.


Table 2.1     Recommended Design Quality Criteria and Broad Brush Targets

#

Design Quality Criteria

Broad Brush Target

1

Create a ‘sense of place’ by relating the landscape design to the unique character of the site context in Hong Kong

See information in Chapter 3 and also:

·         Landscape themes will respond to the specific character and site context of each of the landscaped areas (Referring to Section 3.1- Landscape Design under T2 and Section 3.2- Landscape Design for the TRC, both sections describe how desired character and theming is achieved through the landscape design.)

2

Enhance the airport’s appearance through an attractive and innovative landscape setting and the creation of a welcoming gateway on arrival and departure

See information in Chapter 3 and also:

·         Landscape themes will be coordinated across the different public exposure zones, with an emphasis on an exciting and attractive welcoming gateway to HKIA (Referring to Section 3.1-Landscape Design under T2 Expansion, the description of the planting design to create sense of arrival for visitor is adopted.)

3.

Maximise greening of external open space, including reclamation edge

·         Target to achieve 20% green coverage as far as practicable in external open spaces.  Green coverage will include airside turf planting, roadside planting and amenity planting.

4

Balance built form by connecting it to the external and surrounding landscape

See information in Chapter 3 and also:

·         Ensure interface areas between built form and the external spaces contain landscape hard and soft elements, unless otherwise justified (Referring Figure 3.1 and drawings of Annex E and Annex F, show that the interface areas between built form and the external spaces contain landscape hard and soft elements)

·         Integrate building and landscape design so that there is no abrupt boundary between the two environments (See Figure 3.1 and drawings of Annex E and Annex F, show that there is no abrupt boundary between them.)

5

Maximise internal landscapes within building structures.

·         Ensure consideration has been made to integrate greening (e.g. indoor planting and within planters, etc.) within key building structures, where feasible.

6

Minimise adverse impacts on the existing landscape and visual resources

·         Compensate felled trees based on a target replacement ration of 1:1 (See Section 4.1, para 3- Tree Compensatory, 1:1 ratio is adopted in accordance with technical circulars which most of the trees need to be compensated outside the works sites. Detail refer to Table 4.2)

·         Requirement that 100% of disturbed areas (e.g. temporary works areas) shall be reinstated

7

Select planting species that are sustainable and do not attract wildlife, are characteristic of the local micro-climate and are economically feasible and cost-effective to maintain

·         Ensure the planting species comply with the Airport’s Approved Plant Species List (See Section 3.1 and Table 4.3. A list of Tree species is provided in accordance with APSL).

·         Reduce potable water use for landscaping to a practical, cost-effective minimum, beyond a 12-month establishment period


3                            Aesthetic Architectural Designs for Building Structures & Facilities

The T2 Expansion and TRC are the key elements of the 3RS Project with good potential for aesthetic architectural design, and these major buildings are therefore the focus of this Chapter.

Other buildings under planning for development as part of the 3RS Project include ancillary buildings associated with an operating airport of a functional nature such as ground services equipment, staging and servicing facilities, air traffic control observation facilities, Civil Aviation Department (CAD) facilities, Hong Kong Observatory (HKO) facilities, stores, security gatehouses, and many other small ancillary buildings.  The WSA and ESA will have a number of mainly franchisee and government airport buildings supporting the operational needs of the 3RS, including police and fire stations, cargo handling facilities, aircraft caterers, aircraft maintenance facilities and so on.

In general, these buildings have rather limited potential to significantly affect the Project’s landscape and visual environment due to building functionality, airport height limit restrictions and very onerous limitations on planting in airside areas; landscape provision in the airside is limited to grass only.  

3.1                             Terminal 2 (T2) Expansion

The T2 is being expanded from a departures only terminal to a full service processing terminal (with departure, arrival and transfer facilities), with connected functionality to the TRC.  The T2 Expansion involves the construction of the T2 Expansion main building, including the basement, north and south annex buildings, the associated road network for connecting existing airport facilities and utility upgrading works.  The expanded T2 will comprise eight storeys with a maximum building height of 51.20mPD.  The net site area of the T2 Expansion is estimated to be 130,138m2, while the overall site coverage of the T2 main building within the site boundary is approximately 52.5%.  Drawing no. ACM/P282/SKC/060606 and ACM/TT219/282/BDA/4000006 of Annex E shows the preliminary details of T2 Expansion, including site area, disposition of buildings and building height.

Background and Architectural Design Objectives for T2 Expansion Building Structures/Facilities

The architectural idea centres around a ‘Feather’ concept that is aerodynamic and reminiscent of flight.  It aims to reflect and re-interpret the architectural language of Terminal 1, but with a fresh and invigorating approach.  It also aims to provide a logical planning approach and intuitive orientation benefit for the passengers with its directional “feathers”.  Overall this fits with the design quality criteria of creating a ‘sense of place’ (design quality criteria #1) and enhancing the airport’s appearance (design quality criteria #2) as well as balancing built form by connecting the building with the external elements (design quality criteria #4).  Figure 3.1 illustrates some of the T2 Expansion design concepts. 

Landscape Design of T2 Expansion

A holistic Landscape Masterplan has been developed for T2 Expansion works covering the proposed building, landscape deck and departure kerb, and the planting strategy aims to create a unique arrival experience that compliments the scenic journey offered by Lantau Island to the south (design quality criteria #1, #2, #3, #4).  Rhythmical landform, accentuated by shrub plantings and coloured gravel are proposed that will integrate with the viaduct structure to soften the visual impact of the engineering infrastructure.  Overall, the delicate arrangement of the planting layout aims to create a compelling visual stimulation and enhance the sense of arrival for visitors (design quality criteria #2).  Planting layouts are carefully arranged to respond to the speed of travel and the spatial planning of buildings and road works (design quality criteria #4).  It should be noted that the detailed design of roadside planting for the T2 expansion is not yet completed and will be undertaken under a separate design contract.

Overall, the landscape design for T2 Expansion can be categorized into areas with relatively higher or lower exposure (visually or physically) to visitors.  For soft landscape works, the planting species are selected in accordance with the HKIA APSL (design quality criteria #7) as well as their suitability and adaptability to their planting location and their association with adjacent species to create the desired visual effect (design quality criteria #7).

Areas with high exposure to visitors include the arrival area and Ground Transportation Centre (GTC) roof interface, temporary landscape area, and the deck landscape at HKIA and Airport World Trade Centre (AWTC).  Soft landscape treatment in these areas visually enhances edge treatment of terrace structures (design quality criteria #4), responds to the surrounding buildings/ structures to create a visually stimulating pattern and pleasant environment, and transforms certain areas into intimate spaces that might be used by office workers or visitors for leisure and passive use (e.g. a “pocket garden” on the deck at HKIA and AWTC).  Indicative greenery coverage plans for T2 Expansion are provided in the “Landscape and Visual aspects of T2 Expansion drawings (p.1 – p.8) of Annex E.

In the early stages of a project the BEAM Plus process requires a Provisional Assessment (PA) of buildings to determine the expected BEAM Plus rating based on confirmed designs and environmental commitments.  The T2 Expansion has achieved a Platinum rating at the BEAM Plus PA stage.  Given that specific BEAM Plus credits for percentage planting and greening targets are not being directly applied to the T2 Expansion, an approach of seeking to maximise greenery and landscapes in areas with higher public exposure has been adopted as part of the design.

[Note: As the T2 Expansion detailed design is ongoing, further detail is to be provided in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022 after detailed designs are expected to be completed.]


 

3.2                             Third Runway Concourse (TRC)

The TRC is an airside concourse building with full departure, arrival & transfer functions.  In the Initial Phase of the Project, the TRC will comprise seven storeys with a maximum building height of about +50mPD, with 38 contact aircraft parking positions, 28 fixed link bridges (FLB), a new Air Traffic Control (ATC) Tower to the south along with associated safeguarding, and enabling works to facilitate future expansion.  The site area of the TRC is estimated to be 130,142m2. To align with the expected slower passenger growth in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, it should be noted that AAHK has been considering a possible flexible phasing plan for the commissioning of some portions of the 3RS passenger facilities from 2024 onwards and this may delay the completion of some detailed designs including for the TRC.  In the event that detailed designs are not completed by the time of the Final L&V Plan submission, the final plan will be further updated in due course.

Background and Architectural Design Objectives for Building Structures/Facilities

Architecturally, the TRC will be themed as a microcosm of Hong Kong, with elements including civic, urban, and nature providing an underlying framework to give the concourse unique visual characteristics (design quality criteria #1, #2, #4) while taking functionality, performance, longevity, efficiency and 24/7 operations into account.

Distinct from the existing HKIA T1 where passengers move through all processes under a single roof, future TRC passengers will be required to ride an Automated People Mover (APM) to arrive at TRC from the separate T2 Expansion terminal.  The two buildings will form part of a singular sequential harmonious experience for passengers.  This synergy will be enhanced by the building’s architecture, with the major elements and spaces of the building (such as roof form, lighting interior design, etc.) being one uniform family.  A linear ribbon roof design approach is proposed for both T2 Expansion and TRC, with the legibility, orientation, responsiveness and clarity from the T2 Expansion extending through to the TRC. The conceptual architectural design of TRC is provided in the “Overall TRC View” drawings in Annex F although this is subject to further updates as the TRC detailed design progresses, and this detail will be provided in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022.

This synergy and linkage will also be a feature of the interior and lighting designs for the two buildings.  Lighting spectrums and portals for enhancing spatial orientation, sense of space and ambience will be designed to enhance and support the TRC architecture as well as being themed to reflect Hong Kong local experiences.  Interior public area lighting is directional and designed to avoid glare from internal or external areas.  Lighting to the external landscaped courtyard will be low level with some accent lighting to landscaped features and planting.  Building perimeter lighting is generally provided by high mast fittings necessary for aircraft operational areas (OM5).

The visual massing of the TRC is reduced by the extensive use of glass in both the main elevations and also in the Fixed Link Bridges.  The roof incorporates gentle and sweeping curvature and has a continuous roof edge profile that accentuates its linear form and flowing geometry (OM3). 

Facade and roof materials and colours are in harmony with the other airport passenger buildings. Darker colours are used at the apron level to visually lift the building facades and to provide a consistent ground level banding.  Silver and grey tones provide a level of reflectance to the roof edges and facade elements (OM4).

Further preliminary details of the TRC building, including site area and site coverage are provided in Annex F.

Landscape Design for the TRC

In line with the architectural design concept and theming, and inspired by Hong Kong as one of the world’s most exciting and vibrant cities, the future landscape design of the TRC will provide a critical, integrated solution to ensure the desired character and theming is achieved (design quality criteria #1, #2, #5).  Figure 3.2 illustrates some of the TRC design concepts.

Landscape designs are a key consideration for the interior of the TRC concourse, mainly in the courtyard area at the Departures Level (design quality criteria #5). The character of the TRC interior landscape will be a continuation of the T2 terminal interior landscape narrative with the TRC landscape focus being the courtyard.

The TRC is expected to incorporate a substantial landscaped outside courtyard which is accessed directly from the departures level.  Passengers are able to enter the courtyard from a number of locations.  The courtyard has a variety of pathways, seating area and features, along with trees and low level planting.  Greening will comprise shrubs and plants from the HKIA approved Plant Species List.  The courtyard is being designed to be a relaxed and natural environment for passenger enjoyment with landscaping visible through the glass facades from the surrounding interior concourse seating and circulation areas (OM6).  The courtyard is expected to be a major feature and the landscape will help provide a range of experiences and activities that can be enjoyed from within the courtyard itself as well as from inside the concourse areas.   The concept relies on creating a series of hills or mounds that elevate the planting and help define intervening spaces, providing a series of different spaces and routes through the landscaped area. The courtyard may be seen as a garden within which one can casually walk and explore different vistas and attractions. The main facilities proposed in the courtyard include water features, a variety of planting themes, elevated walkways and open spaces that collectively will allow for a range of outdoor events and activities to take place. Indicative landscape and greenery plans for the TRC courtyard are provided in the “Blow-Up Plan A (Central Courtyard for TRC)” drawing in Annex F although these are subject to further updates as the TRC detailed design progresses. 

The TRC is also targeting the Platinum rating in the BEAM Plus Assessment. Again, given the special nature of the TRC as an airport building located entirely in the airside area of the airport, it is recognised that no external landscaping and greenery is possible. Therefore, planting and soft landscaping will be limited to internal areas of the building, including as far as practicable in the form of an outdoor courtyard within the confines of the concourse, as detailed above. The courtyard landscape will be classed as an internal landscape and will not count towards the overall project greenery coverage.

[Note: As the TRC detailed design is ongoing, further details such as conceptual plans/ drawings and photomontages are expected to be provided or updated in the Final L&V Plan by around the end of 2022 subject to detailed design progress.]

 

4                            Tree Treatment and Massed Planting Proposals

This chapter details the treatment of trees for the Project, summarizing locations, size, number and plant species of trees to be transplanted, felled or compensated, before providing information on the programme implementation, maintenance and management schedules.

4.1                             Tree Treatment

The principle of tree preservation/ tree treatment follows the below hierarchy, with #1 being the top priority:

1.    Retain trees at their existing locations and avoid impacting trees if possible;

2.    If impact and removal of trees is unavoidable (e.g. due to overlap with construction works or impact on long-term viability of the tree), suitable trees should be transplanted off-site in a permanent location.  The preferred location of the receptor site is near to the project site if possible, to retain the amenity effect in the vicinity.  Only trees suitable for transplanting should be considered for transplanting.  Factors to be taken into account when determining if a tree is transplantable include:

-              Conditions of the tree to be transplanted (including form, health and structure), which may affect the success of the proposed transplanting;

-              Size (transplanting is often deemed impractical for trees over a certain size), species (species are recognised as generally having a different survival rate after transplanting), and conservation status of the tree to be transplanted;

-              Availability and suitability of a permanent receptor site, both within and outside the Project site;

-              Adequate time for preparation of any transplanting operation;

-              Identification of a long-term maintenance party for the transplanted tree(s);

-              Access to the existing location and transportation to the receptor site (including availability of access to accommodate the tree, topography of the proposed route, engineering limitations, etc.); and

-              Cost-effectiveness.

3.    If neither retaining nor transplanting trees is considered practicable, the last choice is to fell/ remove trees impacted by the Project and undertake compensatory tree planting either within the site or at an appropriate off-site area.

Approximately 2,575 trees were surveyed within the area covering 3RS key project components and a summary of proposed tree treatment is provided in Table 4.1Annex G shows the tree assessment for each tree individually in schedule format and Annex H shows the potential conflicts between existing trees and proposed works and existing/new utilities.  Annex K shows the recipient locations for transplanted trees, while Annex N shows photo records of “retain” and “transplant” trees.  The proposed tree treatments are described below.   

Table 4.1    Proposed Tree Treatment

Total Trees Surveyed

Trees proposed to be felled

Trees proposed to be transplanted

Trees proposed to be retained

2,575

2,219

36

320

Note: Tree numbers are based on August 2020 tree records.

Tree numbers presented in Table 4.1 are subject to adjustment due to changes in baseline data (e.g. from typhoons, etc.) and as more detailed design for Project buildings and infrastructure becomes available.  It is reiterated that the anticipated road alterations identified for the existing southern cargo area and in the western area of the existing airport are not under planning at this time and associated L&V commitments for these areas are not considered further in this plan.  Should the road alterations go ahead, the LMMs and the recommended tree treatments in these areas will then be addressed in the Final L&V Plan to be submitted around the end of 2022 when detailed designs are expected to be completed.  In the event that detailed designs are not completed by the time of the Final L&V Plan submission, the final plan will be further updated in due course.  

Further details of tree treatment are provided below.

Trees to be Retained

320 trees were assessed as not being affected by the 3RS works and are being retained.  Measures are being implemented to protect the existing retained trees on site, including but not limited to the following.

1.    The Contractor shall ensure, for the duration of the works that:

-          No unnecessary intrusion into existing trees to be retained / areas of woodland or shrubland is made;

-          All access routes to construction areas which need to pass through areas of existing trees to be retained / woodland or shrubland shall be approved by the Engineer;

-          The limits of site clearance are to be agreed by the Engineer on site before site clearance commences.  All trees to be cleared shall be marked by the Contractor and approved by the Engineer before felling;

-          No nails or other fixings shall be driven into trees;

-          No fencing or signs shall be attached to trees;

-          No materials or machinery shall be stored within the area of a tree’s crown diameter;

-          No workshop, canteens, or similar shall be installed beneath trees, nor shall equipment maintenance etc. be carried out under trees; and

-          No trees shall be used as anchors for ropes or chains used in guying, pulling and the like.

2.    The Contractor shall exercise the greatest care during the progress of the work to avoid damage to any tree which is not required to be cleared.

-          As soon as the site or any part thereof becomes available the Contractor shall erect Temporary Protective Fencing around each such tree or group of trees, preferably to protect the whole area within the spread of the tree’s crown, but no closer than 2m from the trunk of any such tree.  A generic tree protection plan is provided in Annex I for reference.  In case there is site limitation to provide the standard tree protection zone, the contractor should develop a contract-specific tree protection plan comprising of the detail proposal of tree protection zone and fencing.  The plan should be agreed with the Engineer.

-          The Contractor shall inform the Engineer if works are to be carried out within such fenced areas and, save with the express permission of the Engineer or on his order, all such work shall be executed using only hand-held tools.

3.    The Contractor shall maintain the Temporary Protective Fencing in good repair and subsequently remove it.

-          Removal shall be subject to the permission of the Engineer which shall not normally be given earlier than the substantial completion of an adjacent part of the Works other than Landscape Soft works.

-          The Contractor may seek permission to remove the fencing temporarily if its removal is necessary for the satisfactory execution of the Works.  The Contractor shall reinstate the temporary protective fencing as soon as possible.

4.    Temporary Protective Fencing shall be provided, and shall ideally be constructed of strong, impenetrable material such as steel sheet or wooden board.

-          In certain circumstances where space for tree protection is a particular problem, protection of the tree trunk with planks may be acceptable.  In these cases, the ground within the root zone should be protected from compaction with mats and gravel or boards/tracks for vehicles. (It should be noted that these treatments should only be used temporarily so that anaerobic soil conditions do not build up in the root zone).

5.    Unless adequate proof is submitted by the Contractor to demonstrate that death or damage of existing vegetation was caused by circumstances beyond his control, replacement of dead or damaged plants of similar sizes of the same species will be required as instructed by the Engineer.

-          When instructed by the Engineer, slow release fertilizer shall be applied to existing mature trees in a feeding band 1.5m either side of the branch spread as and when required. 

Trees for Transplantation

36 trees affected by the 3RS works are proposed to be transplanted.  Selection for transplanting has taken account of the above criteria and only trees with high conservation value or medium to high amenity value (including rare and precious species and with high suitability for transplanting) have been considered.  Most of the 3RS Project surveyed trees found to be in conflict with the proposed works had low amenity value, poor structure/form for transplanting, low anticipated survival chance after transplanting, were too mature or oversized or had poor health, hence were not found to be suitable for transplanting.  The locations of the trees identified as suitable to be transplanted are shown in drawing no. TRD/3103/AA-XX-G/DR/000001 and TRD/3103/AA-XX-G/DR/100001-100010 of Annex J. The recipient locations of transplanted trees to date and the tentative identified recipient locations for the remaining trees to be transplanted are shown in Annex K.  A typical tree transplantation specification is also provided in Annex L for reference.  Further details of species to be transplanted are listed in Annex G showing the trees range in size from 4-14 m in height.  Tree transplanting will be undertaken before or during the early stages of construction at respective areas.  

Trees for Removal/ Felling

2,219 trees were assessed as needing to be removed/ felled.  In accordance with the hierarchy of tree treatment presented above, trees in conflict with the proposed works, with low conservation or low amenity value (i.e. common species and/or of poor health/ structure/ form) and with low suitability for transplanting were recommended to be felled (shown in Drawing no. TRD/3103/AA-XX/G/DR-000001, TRD/3103/AA-XX/G/DR/100001-100010 of Annex J).  Annex H shows the proposed works plan overlaid onto the tree treatment plan, identifying the various potential conflicts to existing trees, thereby justifying the tree treatment recommendations. Further details of species to be felled are listed in Annex G showing the trees range in size from 3-20 m in height.  Tree removal will be undertaken before or during the early stages of construction at respective areas.  

It should be noted that no protected/ rare/ endemic/ old and valuable tree species (including trees for transplantation and removal/ felling) were affected by 3RS works, with reference to the IUCN Red Data Books, intenational conventions for conservations of wildlife, as well as relevant local legislation and other references (i.e. Cap. 96 Forests and Countryside Ordinance; Cap. 586 Protection of Endangered Species of Animals and Plants Ordinance; Register of Old and Valuable Tree; Rare and Precious Plants of Hong Kong; China Plant Red Data Book).  One individual of rare tree species (Gleditsia australis) was recorded (Xing et al., 2000)[4], but this tree species is not protected under local or regional legislation.  Furthermore, the location of this tree was acquired by the government for construction of temporary emergency hospital to handle COVID-19 pandemic.  It is not located within 3RS works areas and therefore not affected by 3RS construction works.

Tree Compensation

Taking relevant technical circulars into account, e.g. DEVB TC (W) No. 4/2020 Tree Preservation, a compensatory tree planting ratio of 1:1 in terms of quantity is targeted for the trees that require felling to make way for the 3RS project.  However, according to Appendix C of DEVB TC (W) No. 4/2020: “As far as practicable, implementation of compensatory tree planting should be of a ratio not less than 1:1 in terms of number, i.e. the number of compensatory trees onsite and offsite not be lower than that of the number of trees removed including dead trees, but excluding trees of undesirable species.”. As Leucaena Leucocephala is classed as an undesirable species, it has been excluded from the tree compensation target.

It is noted that 65 of the tree species Leucaena leucocephala were assessed as needing to be felled.  As this undesirable specieshas been excluded, the target number of compensatory trees was adjusted to 2,154.  The 2,154 trees are targeted to be compensated both within and outside the 3RS project works sites at HKIA, including scattered plots of available land on the Airport Island (refer to Annex M for plot locations) as well as on new 3RS land.  

In order to enhance the planting arrangements of the compensatory trees, the combined land area of the scattered plots provisionally allocated for compensatory tree planting is around 2.5 times the size of the combined land areas from which trees are being lost due to 3RS Project works on existing airport land.  This is due to the fact that most of the trees proposed to be felled were planted much more densely than the spacing requirements now laid down in prevailing guidelines.  As such, the target compensatory tree numbers are based on a like-to-like approach, whereby a range of tree spacing intervals (i.e. 3 to 5 metres) are adopted depending on the tree planting densities previously observed in specific areas.  Therefore, actual compensatory tree numbers are also subject to actual site conditions and constraints during the detail design stage with updated details to be provided in the Final L&V Plan  around the end of 2022.  In the event that detailed designs are not completed by the time of the Final L&V Plan submission, the final plan will be further updated in due course.

In relation to the landscape and visual mitigation arrangements at Sha Chau, indicated on Drawing No. MCL/P132/EIA/15-028.4 of the approved EIA report, it should be noted that EP commitments focussed on minimizing the footprint of the daylighting / pipeline alignment works on Sha Chau, with the aim of avoiding impacts to the nearby egretry.  As such, no trees were permitted to be felled in conjunction with the Sha Chau works.

Given the island’s undisturbed nature, its thriving egretry, the lack of any available areas for additional tree planting and major access difficulties, compensatory tree planting (OM7) on Sha Chau will not be pursued.

A summary of the estimated tree compensation numbers in various locations is shown in Table 4.2.  The tree planting quantity and planting spacing are subject to actual site constraints e.g. clashes with supporting infrastructure, underground utilities etc.  The selection of tree species and planting arrangements are to be developed during the detailed designs of the compensatory planting locations.

Table 4.2    Proposed Tree Compensation Locations & Estimated Numbers

Location (Refer to Drawing no. TRD/3103/AA-XX/G/DR/000003)

Proposed Compensatory Trees No. (estimate)

On New 3RS land

 

East Support Area (ESA) (Area L)

43

On Existing Airport Island

 

Within 3RS works sites (Area B)

382

Outside 3RS works sites

1,729

HKIA North Area (Areas A, and C)

43

North Interchange (central roundabout of Area B)

39

Scenic Hill (Area H and M)

100

AEL Track (Area D)

695

HKIA South Cargo Area (Areas E, F, G, I, J and K)

852

GRAND TOTAL

2,154

*Note: Estimated numbers are based on a like-for-like approach, whereby a range of tree spacing intervals (3 to 5m) are adopted depending on the tree densities previously observed in the area.  The compensatory tree numbers will be subject to actual site constraints during the detailed design stage.

It is noted that compensatory planting opportunities are further restricted by the HKIA APSL that controls the species, density and locations of trees and shrubs with due regard for aviation safety concerns relating to bird attraction at an operating aerodrome.  Table 4.3 lists APSL tree species planting selections and anticipated planting spacing requirements, noting other species may also be used, subject to meeting APSL requirements.

Table 4.3    Tree Species Planting Selections

Species

Spacing (mm)

Plumeria obtusa

3000

Plumeria rubra

3000

Bauhinia blakeana

4000

Lagerstroemia speciosa

4000

Callistemon viminalis

5000

Delonix regia

5000

Spathodea campanulata

5000

Saraca asoca

5000

Tabebuia impetiginosa

5000

Bauhinia purpurea

5000

Tabebuia roseo-alba

5000

Tabebuia argentea

5000

Cassia fistula

5000

Grevillea robusta

5000

Cassia spectabilis

5000

Peltophorum pterocarpum

5000

4.2                          Implementation Programme, Maintenance and Management Schedules

 

The trees identified as suitable for transplanting from 3RS construction sites are being moved in accordance with 3RS construction progress in relevant 3RS works areas.  The compensatory trees to be provisioned on 3RS sites will be planted towards the end of the respective works programme for different works areas.  Tree compensation in other locations identified across HKIA is expected to take place as the different land areas for compensation become available and in coordination with AAHK land use planning around each area. 

AAHK will coordinate all required tree management elements, including the phasing and detailed planning for compensatory trees. This work will include the development of appropriate landscaping detail in the various planting locations to meet recognised requirements for tree planting.

The 3RS EM&A Manual specifies that planting works shall be checked during a 12-month establishment period after completion of 3RS construction works, in this case after each batch of transplanting or compensation works is completed.  Engineering and construction works progress shall be regularly reviewed on site to identify the earliest practical opportunities for the tree compensation and landscaping works to be undertaken.   

Measures undertaken during the construction phase and the 12-month establishment period shall be audited by a landscape architect, as a member of the Environmental Team (ET), on a regular basis to ensure the required standards are achieved and works are successful.  Documentation on compliance will be carried out in the EM&A Reports as necessary.  Implementation of landscape construction works and subsequent maintenance activity after each batch of transplanting or compensation works during the 12-month establishment period shall also be supervised by a Registered Landscape Architect or Professional Member of the Hong Kong Institute of Landscape Architects. 

After the establishment period, responsibility for the long term management of planting works (including trees) will transfer to AAHK’s long-term landscaping contractor.  Planting works shall be monitored during the first 10 years after the completion of each batch of transplanting or compensation works. 

 


5                            implementation of landscape and visual mitigation measures

This chapter provides the implementation schedule, which outlines the landscape and visual mitigation measures to be implemented, including the implementation agent, location, timing and status.  Details on the application of the mitigation measures can be found in Annex B, while relevant drawings and figures showing the proposed mitigation measures relating to greenery, T2 Expansion and TRC are further provided in Annex E and Annex F.

It should be noted that some of the proposed landscape and visual mitigation measures are not yet addressed in the current submission as detailed designs are ongoing.  Table 5.1 below summarises details of the construction phase mitigation measures and high level details of the operational phase mitigation measures.  As the operational phase mitigation measures are ongoing, these will be further reported in the Final L&V Plan, subject to detailed design progress.  Progress on the implementation of the operation phase measures will also be updated in regular EM&A reporting in due course.


Table 5.1    Implementation Schedule (for construction stage)

EIA Ref.

(Why)

EM&A Ref.

(Why)

 

EP Condition

 

Environmental Protection Measures

(What)

Location / Duration of Measures
Timing of Completion of Measures (Where / When)

Implementation Agent

(Who)

Implementation
Stage

(When)

Implementation
Status

(What)

Timeline

(When)

Des

C

O

Landscape and Visual Impact - Construction Phase

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM1 - The construction area and contractor’s temporary works areas should be minimised to avoid impacts on adjacent landscape.

All works areas for duration of works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(all relevant 3RS contractors)

 

 

Construction and temporary works areas for 3RS works contracts are minimised and are subject to ongoing ET inspections; contractor work sites on reclaimed land are defined in works tender specifications such that impacts on adjacent landscapes are minimised.

3RS works sites on existing airport land are all allocated; phased allocation of construction site areas for works packages on new 3RS land ongoing.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM2 - Reduction of construction period to practical minimum.

All works areas for duration of works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(all relevant 3RS contractors)

 

 

Construction phasing and coordination of works packages planned to facilitate full commissioning of the 3RS Project by 2024; ongoing monitoring to ensure mitigation achieved.

Implementation is ongoing and is monitored / tracked by ET during construction.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM3 - Phasing of the construction stage to reduce visual impacts during the construction phase.

All works areas for duration of works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(all relevant 3RS contractors)

 

 

Construction phasing and coordination of works packages intended to ensure visual impacts minimised during construction phase. Ongoing monitoring to ensure mitigation achieved.

Implementation is ongoing and is monitored / tracked by ET during construction.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM4 - Construction traffic (land and sea) including construction plants, construction vessels and barges should be kept to a practical minimum.

All works areas for duration of works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(all relevant 3RS contractors)

 

 

Stringent management and control of construction works vessels by the dedicated Marine Traffic Control Centre; clear specifications on vehicle emissions standards in contracts and no land access to new reclamation works area during construction except in an emergency.

Implementation is ongoing and is monitored / tracked by ET during construction.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM5 - Erection of decorative mesh screens or construction hoardings around works areas in visually unobtrusive colours.

All works areas for duration of works;
Upon handover and completion of works - may be disassembled in phases.

Contractor

(all relevant 3RS contractors)

 

 

Hoardings installed around all key 3RS building work sites.  Visually unobtrusive, colour sensitive screens hoardings adopted for HDD works on Sha Chau.

Implementation is ongoing and is monitored / tracked by ET during construction.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM6 - Avoidance of excessive height and bulk of site buildings and structures.

New passenger
concourse, T2 expansion and other proposed airport related buildings and structures under the project; Upon handover and completion of works.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

Site buildings and structures generally limited to 2 to 3 storeys for main 3RS contract office areas; office footprints minimised on existing airport works sites, partlydue to limited available space.

Implementation is ongoing and is monitored / tracked by ET during construction.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM7 - Control of night-time lighting by hooding all lights and through minimisation of night working periods.

All works areas for
duration of works;
 

Upon handover and completion of works - may be disassembled in phases.

Contractor

(all relevant 3RS contractors)

 

 

Lighting limitations specified in 3RS contracts, noting stringent requirements already required to ensure nighttime lighting does not impact on airport flight movements.

Implementation is ongoing and is monitored / tracked by ET during construction.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM8 - All existing trees shall be carefully protected during construction. Detailed Tree Protection Specification shall be provided in the Contract Specification. Under this specification, the Contractor shall be required to submit, for approval, a detailed working method statement for the protection of trees prior to undertaking any works adjacent to all retained trees, including trees in contractor’s works areas.

All existing trees to be retained;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(3302, 3501, 3503, 3508, 3601, 3602, 3603, 3801, 3802)

 

Protection measures for trees are provided by contractors in works areas with existing trees in accordance with tree protection specifications in contracts. Contractor method statements are required for tree protection works for AAHK and ET review/ approval prior to commencement of works in areas.  Implemented tree protection measures are checked by ET during weekly site inspections.  Status on all retained trees are captured in an overall project tree schedule and is checked by the ET during site inspections.  A generic tree protection plan is included in the L&V Plan at Annex I.

Ongoing.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM9 - Trees unavoidably affected by the works shall be transplanted where practical. A detailed Tree Transplanting Specification shall be provided in the Contract Specification, if applicable. Sufficient time for necessary tree root and crown preparation periods shall be allowed in the project programme.

All existing trees to be affected by
the works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(3302, 3501, 3503, 3508, 3601, 3602, 3603, 3801, 3802)

 

36 trees identified for transplantation in the overall project tree schedule; a typical tree transplanting specification has been included in the L&V Plan.  Recipient locations for transplanted trees are indicated in the L&V Plan at Annex K with tentative identified recipient locations for trees to be transplanted also provided for reference.

Ongoing.

Table 15.6

12.3

2.18, 3.2

CM10 - Land formation works shall be followed with advanced hydroseeding around taxiways and runways as soon as practical.

All affected existing grass areas around runways and verges / Duration of works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(3303)

 

Advanced hydroseeding will be carried out around taxiways and runways as soon as practicable in turfed locations and this will be checked by ET in regular inspections as necessary.

Land formation works are still in progress, hydroseeding to follow accordingly.

Landscape and Visual Impact - Operation Phase

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM1 - Sensitive landscape design of reclamation edge by incorporating different angles of gradient and the use of a range of armour rock sizes placed randomly in a riprap approach for an irregular appearance. Planting of native coastal plants shall be incorporated.

New land formation edge;
Completion of Design Stage.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

The new seawall on the land formation edge incorporates both vertical and sloping seawalls with different rock armour sizes and shapes in a rip-rap arrangement. Multiple eco-enhanced seawall blocks are being installed to increase microhabitats and ecological value of the seawall and to enhance the visual appearance of the marine structure. Planting of native coastal plants will be considered subject to aviation safety requirements and in accordance with the HKIA Approved Plant Species list.

Ongoing, as land formation works are still in progress.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM2 - All above ground structures, including, Vent Shafts, Emergency and Firemen’s’ Accesses etc. shall be, either fully integrated with the planned buildings, or sensitively designed in a manner that responds to the existing and planned urban context, and minimises potential adverse landscape and visual impacts.

All locations of above ground structures;
Completion of Design Stage.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

The design of all above ground structures will be regularly reviewed to ensure that they are in harmony during detailed design stage.  AAHK to provide relevant details in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022 subject to detailed design progress.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM3 - Sensitive design of buildings and structures in terms of scale, height and bulk (visual weight).

All locations of above ground structures;
Completion of Design Stage.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

Mitigation requirement factored into buildings design criteria - AAHK to provide relevant details in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022 subject to detailed design progress.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM4 - Use appropriate building materials and colours in built structures to create cohesive visual mass.

All locations of above ground structures;
Completion of Design Stage.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

Mitigation requirement factored into buildings design criteria - AAHK to provide relevant details in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022 subject to detailed design progress.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM5 - Lighting units to be directional and minimise unnecessary light spill and glare.

All locations within the project site boundary;
Completion of Design Stage.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

Requirements for lighting factored into buildings and infrastructure design criteria and noting stringent requirements to ensure lighting does not impact on airport flight movements.  AAHK to provide relevant details in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022 subject to detailed design progress.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM6 - Greening measures, including vertical greening, green roofs, road verge planting and peripheral screen planting shall be implemented.

All locations within the project site boundary where greening measures can be implemented as far as possible;
Ongoing duration.

Contractor

(3302, 3501, 3503, 3508, 3601, 3602, 3603, 3801)

 

The project site area for landscape design and greenery calculation is defined in the Initial Revised L&V Plan and the defined boundary ties in with the EIA figure MCL/P132/EIA/15-028.1).  The final greenery calculation will encompass several categories of landscaping including airside turf areas, roadside and amenity planting.  Building greening features (internal and external) are not included in the overall greening calculation, but such features and their extent will be detailed in the Final L&V Plan around the end of 2022 subject to detailed design progress.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM7 - Compensatory Tree Planting for all felled trees shall be provided to the satisfaction of relevant Government departments. Required numbers and locations of compensatory trees shall be determined and agreed separately with Government during the Tree Felling Application
process under the relevant technical circulars.

All trees effected by the works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(to be implemented by future landscape contractors)

The overall project tree schedule (i.e. Annex G of the Initial Revised L&V Plan) summarises the trees to be felled due to the 3RS Project.  In accordance with relevant Government technical circulars, a compensatory tree planting ratio of 1:1 is targeted for all trees felled; compensatory trees will be located in the 3RS works areas, on scattered plots of available land on the existing island and in parts of the new reclamation area.  Specific details on the number, type and location of compensatory trees will be developed by the detailed landscape design consultant and updated when detailed designs are available. It is noted that some areas allocated for compensatory trees may only be available after 2022.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM8 - Streetscape (e.g. paving, signage, street furniture, lighting etc.) shall be sensitively designed in a manner that responds to the existing and planned urban context, and minimises potential adverse landscape and visual impacts.

All locations of streetscape treatment works;
Completion of Design Stage.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

Requirements for streetscapes are specified in 3RS buildings and infrastructure design criteria and shall minimise potential landscape and visual impact while tying in to existing airport streetscapes and complying with airside operational requirements.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM9 - All streetscape areas and hard and soft landscape areas disturbed during construction shall be reinstated to equal or better quality (due to implementation of screen planting, road verge planting etc.), to the satisfaction of the relevant Government departments.

All locations of streetscape treatment works;
Upon handover and completion of works.

Contractor

(to be implemented by future landscape contractors)

 

 

All streetscape and landscape areas disturbed during construction shall be reinstated in accordance with relevant Government requirements and this will be checked by ET during regular inspections.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM10 - Aesthetic improvement planting of viaduct structure through greening of structure to mitigate visual impact of viaduct form.

All locations of viaduct structures;
Ongoing duration.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

Requirements for viaduct structure designs are specified in design criteria and their development will be checked by the ET during regular inspections.

Ongoing.

Table 15.7

12.3

2.18, 3.2

OM11 - Sensitive design of footbridges, noise barriers and enclosures with greening (screen planting/ climbers/ planters) and chromatic
measures.

All locations of viaduct structures;
Ongoing duration.

Design Engineer

(P282 / 3131 / 3133 / 3138 / 3142 / 3144)

 

 

Where practical, greening measures for footbridges, noise barriers and enclosures will be designed in coordination with the landscape and greening design of T2 Expansion and SkyCity - the design submissions of the aforesaid measures will be checked by ET.

Ongoing.

 

 



([1]) These Annexes will be updated in the final L&V Plan to be submitted around the end of 2022 after detailed designs are expected to have been completed, to provide better perspective drawings and/or photomontages, etc.

 

([2]) ICAO is a UN specialized agency, established by States in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago Convention)

([3]) For ICAO’s Strategic Objectives, see at: https://www.icao.int/Pages/default.aspx

 

[4] Xing, F.W., Ng, S.C., and Chau, L.K.C. (2000). Gymnosperms and angiosperms of Hong Kong. Memoirs of the Hong Kong Natural History Society 23: 21-136.